Ross broilers

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by raroo, Nov 10, 2008.

  1. raroo

    raroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey everyone, I'm new here:)

    I've been researching like mad but maybe you guys can help me.
    Not sure if this is the right topic to be posting in, but it seems the closest.

    My question is this: I have two Ross broiler chicks, and I was wondering any of you know the difference between Ross and CornishX, if there are any? From what I understand, they aren't the same, but I'm having difficulty finding out the differences.

    I am mainly wondering if there are any differences in problems with the heart and legs, and growth rate.

    I've never had chickens before, and my two wee ones were sort of sprung on me as a surprise. From what I've read the news for broiler chickens as pets isn't good, but I can't find much info on the Ross broilers.
    Probably wishful thinking, but I'm looking for leads on how to give these chicks as normal and happy a life as possible without them having heart and leg problems.
     
  2. Just-Like-Hatching

    Just-Like-Hatching Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know nothing about the Ross broilers, but wanted give you a quick Welcome to the BYC..
     
  3. Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay

    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ross is a genetics/breeding company that produces commercial chicks for the broiler industry. They are identical or very similar to the so-called "Cornish X" that are available at hatcheries throughout the USA.

    Feed them a standard broiler feeding program and they will growt into a nice carcass for you.

    Jim
     
  4. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    What he said. Most your broilers come out of three large breeders (Avigen, Cobb-Vantress and Ross) which are sold as either hatching eggs or breeding stock to commercial hatcheries and/or large broiler producers. Each company will offer dozens of different broilers for different conditions; all of which are generically labeled "Cornish Cross" for simplicity's sake.
     
  5. raroo

    raroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ahhh, okay, thank you both for clearing that up.
    I know the odds aren't good, but I'm going to try raise my peepers as pets.
    I've been hand raising them in the house and they cuddle in my palms and do their cute bustling scratching thing on my stomach, then fall asleep on me. We're quite bonded now. [​IMG]
    I would one day like to raise chickens for food, and also to have some pretty laying hens. [​IMG] Just need my own property first, I've always dreamed of a small farm, I need BC to have a nice real estate recession it's murder to buy property up here, sigh.
     
  6. greyfields

    greyfields Overrun With Chickens

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    Sadly, most cornish crosses will die of natural causes before 1 year of age.

    I have some Freedom Rangers which are over 2 years old now; but their genetic programming isn't as extreme as the CX.
     
  7. raroo

    raroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, I was pretty upset when I learned that after having already bonded with my chicks.
    They are actually one of the sweetest and cuddliest pets I've had so far. I'm going to try keep them lean and healthy by rationing their feed and supplementing it with vitamins, greens, bugs and worms.
     
  8. mendocinobirds

    mendocinobirds Out Of The Brooder

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    Cornish X can live up to 4 years (so far). They are hearty birds that free range well and age well with the right care. Because they can't really roost, the bedding must be clean. I had two die of fungal infections recently. We had too much rain and everything got moldy. But don't believe they die before 1 year if raised with care
     
  9. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cornish Cross is a generic term for the commercial selectively bred lines of broiler chickens. There are 5 or 6 companies maintaining their own lines.

    Ross Broiler is a specific line. A Ross Broiler is a Cornish Cross but a Cornish Cross is not necessarily a Ross Broiler.




    If you wanted birds to live normal chicken lives - these are not the right ones. They're bred to be butchered before 12 weeks - health isn't really a priority in what they've been selected for.
     
    chickengeorgeto likes this.
  10. ChickenJerk

    ChickenJerk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In fact breeding for bird health is one of the highest priorities of the industry. It is the husbandry practices of many backyard operations that compromise the health of this type chicken. When provided with the care that their breeding requires to excell 95% of them make it to market. The percentage of this type bird that are lost in backyard production would result in failure for the commercial producer.
    These birds are bred to produce meat with minimal but specific requirements. No thought of breeding companion animals is in their genetic plan. Sure you can try to make them what they aren't but plan on dealing with disappointment.
     

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