Run & Coop along (a sequel to my other thread)

3KillerBs

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Actually ~8' wide for a ~6' high arch.
Length of hoop depends on which panels you use, they are different sizes, and then how many panels you use.

OK. The plans I was looking at must have been labeled wrong. I'll edit to save confusion.

Thanks.

(Edit made. I really must build one myself at some point so I don't end up repeating bad/impractical information).
 

NatJ

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https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/aarts-hoop-coop-chicken-tractor.72211/
This article shows a movable hoop coop. It has a base made of wood, and big wire panels ("cattle panels") bent over to form the sides and top. The panels are pretty sturdy, but they have large holes, so the whole thing gets covered with hardware cloth to keep chickens in and predators out. There's a door at one end, and a tarp to keep the weather out.

For a hoop coop that will not be moved, the cattle panels can be secured with stakes hammered into the ground, instead of being fastened to boards at the bottom. (Boards work fine on a stationary coop, but stakes into the ground do NOT work for a movable coop!)

There are many variations of hoop coops, but most of them start with cattle panels (cheap and sturdy and quick to assemble, at least if you compare them to buying lumber and building a solid building.)

There are quite a few other articles with hoop coops too. For example:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/hoop-tractor.69336/
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/ms-biddys-cattle-panel-hoop-coop.73755/

It seems like everyone builds them just a little differently, but the basic form is pretty similar if you begin with a bent cattle panel.
 

3KillerBs

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i was thinking of a triangle roof, with a tall coop with 2 roosts that is about 6 feet wide and 6 feet tall and a few windows with 1 square cm holes, and using pallets for wood

That's a good start of an idea. But you need more than "a few windows". Big vents up under the roof overhangs are what's best.

6x6 = 36 square feet. Appropriate for a maximum of 9 chickens. 6-feet tall is good because it's nice to be able to walk in. My brooder-coop is just over 4 feet tall and I split my scalp open in there standing up too far in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Lumber comes in standard dimensions that are multiples of 4 -- usually in lengths of 8 or 12 feet. 8x8 would be easier to build because you would not have to haul and then cut 12-foot boards. :)
 

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