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Run fencing question.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Rae Scott, Mar 19, 2017.

  1. Rae Scott

    Rae Scott Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 26, 2017
    Northeast Ohio
    Ok so for predator protection I have heard that some say to bury it 2 ft deep, others have said to lay hardware cloth out 2ft on the ground like a wing, which one is right? We have extremely hard packed clay about 3-6 inches down here and am not sure how well digging a trench to bury the fence/wire would go. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Personally, I would bury the hardware cloth (no larger than half inch) as deep as you can AND lay it out away from the interior of the run 2 feet. It's also a good idea to bury hardware cloth under the extent of the floor of the run, to protect against burrowing creatures.
     
  3. BYC910

    BYC910 Overrun With Chickens

    Know your predators first off . What is common in your area .Foxes dogs and the like are worst for digging under . Wire of any kind will rust under dirt . Another option is to pour concrete around your run fence a foot or two out from the wire . You can rent a trencher from most Home Depots. Either for a day or a half day . You can trench a lot in four hours . Trench straight down and either set the run fencing in concrete 12 to 24 inch's deep or just bury it in the dirt . That would depend how soft the dirt is though . If you can dig it easy so can they . I'm close to rock so my chain link fence runs are set in concrete and I only had to go 8 to 12 inch's deep. But even with a rented mixer it was a lot of work and expense. It really comes down to what you want to do .
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  4. zephyricle

    zephyricle Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 4, 2017
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    I live in a place with a lot of dry clay and red dirt and rocks. It's really hard to dig, I agree. You can try using or renting a tiller machine to churn up the dirt for you to save time and a whole lot of effort.

    As for fencing I agree with byc910 to know what predators are in your area. If you're around bobcats, make it taller and more durable. Eagles or owls, you can use a thin netting over the top of the run. Foxes and other digging animals, you should bury fencing or like mentioned earlier, use cement. Bears... well good luck with that one ;)
     
  5. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are still planning or do you already have a coop?

    I built a portable coop, so didn't want to do any digging, as the thing may get moved around. So I used the apron trick. Done this way, the wire is laid flat on the ground, except the part at the coop is bent upwards into an L shape.

    [​IMG]

    Any varmint that attempts to dig their way in starts digging at the base of the coop, where vertical meets horizontal, hits that wire and is stopped. They may move up and down the line probing it, but always keep hitting the wire. They never figure out they need to move back to tunnel their way in. They are smart, but not that smart.
    Any
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  6. Rae Scott

    Rae Scott Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 26, 2017
    Northeast Ohio
    We haven't built anything yet but have plans drawn up. We can't cement anything with the ground because then we have to get permits and have someone licensed do the work and we are running on a massively tight budget just building coop and run and getting broader and feed etc. I have been told someone saw a coyote within 10 miles, foxed (not seen in my area directly as we are an urban area by a very busy highway and shopping area) And we also have opposum and hawks which we plan on doing some type of covering to keep wild bird droppings out of the coop so most likely plastic?

    The ground here is VERY hard, compacted clay that's almost like cement once you get down about 3 inches or so. Even with like a spud bar you can't hardly get through it. To till up the garden we needed a massive industrial strength tiller to get through it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  7. tmarsh83

    tmarsh83 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hard pressed to find anywhere that isn't 10 miles from coyotes.

    If you're gonna cover the run, and frame it up, you'll be fine with an apron.
     



  8. When I said "bury hardware cloth under the extent of the floor of the run", I mean buried under bedding, not necessarily dirt. It still may need to be replaced every so often.
     
  9. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our ground is also very hard, so I wouldn't dig in an apron either, and don't think it would improve things any if I did. If the ground is that hard, varmints won't have an easy time of it either. BTW, I used 1" x 2" galvanized welded wire. It has held up and isn't rusting. Within a few weeks, the grass grew up through and and today you can't even tell it is there.

    A coyote 10 miles away? We have all manner of varmints in the yard. Just found out yesterday my neighbors enjoy watching "the fox" play around in my pasture. I didn't know I have a fox, but apparently I do. I know about the coyotes, coons, skunks, possums, etc, but not the fox. But with the apron I have, it doesn't seem to matter. Nothing has gotten past it. But that is at night. What about during the day?

    During the day, varmints are going to encounter a really hot electric fence. They may have all tangled with it and I never knew or saw it happen, but despite having birds out and about all day long most days, nothing seems to come around to bother them. I chalk that up to that really hot.......make that violently painful......electric fence.
     
  10. kingchickies

    kingchickies Out Of The Brooder

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    Texas
    I have a question also... What type of fencing is best for the run itself? We are building a house style Copland the chickens will be in there at night and it will have the1/4 wire around and under, I've seen chain link, chicken wire, our neighbor has either hog or goat wire with chicken at the bottom. Is there a right or wrong or just preference?
     

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