Run Roof Help!

nmr

Songster
Mar 12, 2020
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Metro West Massachusetts
My husband and I built a 12x20 pallet run for our ducks (fully secured all around with hardware cloth). We decided to do like a circus tent type roof with a large tarp, but after some heavy snow last week, realized it wasn't going to work--no matter how frequently we scraped the snow off the roof.

Today MA is expecting a bit of snow and while our ducks are currently secure in our chicken run, we're trying to come up with affordable ways to re-roof. Are PVC pipes a realistic option? I see a lot of hoop runs made with them, but I'm not sure of the mechanics behind them so I can't make the argument to my husband that PVC pipes are a good option (1" 10' pipes are a hell of a lot cheaper than the nine 2x4x16 boards we are discussing).

Anyway, hoping to get some ideas on what to do. Thanks!
 

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RojoMarz

Songster
May 21, 2020
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Southern CO...at 8600 ft
Would you still cover the pvc with plastic or tarp? I think you will still have some issues. IMO, best to go with a solid roof...could use corrugated metal roofing and purlins, but would still need the main support to be sufficient.
 

nmr

Songster
Mar 12, 2020
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Metro West Massachusetts
Would you still cover the pvc with plastic or tarp? I think you will still have some issues. IMO, best to go with a solid roof...could use corrugated metal roofing and purlins, but would still need the main support to be sufficient.

We would still put the tarp over it. Getting solid panels isn’t an option right now.
 

Alaskan

The Frosted Flake
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If you are staying with the tarp, can you just hugely increase the slope? So you would have to make the center pole maybe twice as high.

I also wonder if a silicone spray used on the tarp would help it shed snow faster.
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
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Guessing the big white tent like thing did not hold up to the snow storm @nmr ?
Curious what's supporting the white 'tarp', other than the one pole I see.
 

nmr

Songster
Mar 12, 2020
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Metro West Massachusetts
Guessing the big white tent like thing did not hold up to the snow storm @nmr ?
Curious what's supporting the white 'tarp', other than the one pole I see.
So my husbands’ idea was to tent it in a way that the snow would slide off. It worked well enough under rain, but did not hold up under this last snow. We didn’t think it would, we just didn’t have time to do anything about it. The tarp is still in good condition though. I think our next plan is to use 2x4s to build a slanted roof.
 

U_Stormcrow

Free Ranging
Jun 7, 2020
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North FL Panhandle Region / Wiregrass
First, I have no snow experience.

Second, wet snow has a weight (for engineering purposes) of 20#/sq ft. Wind packed snow can go up to 25#/, while the light fluffy stuff is about 13-15#/ (the closer temps are to freezing, the heavier the snow tends to be, while truly cold temps tend to produce the very light snows.

12'x20' = 240 sq ft. 1 ft of snowfall, near 30 degrees, is a calculated snow load of 4,800#, or almost 2.5 tons! PVC isn't going to handle that. I'd be using #2 Southern Pine 2x6s, spaced 16"oc, and carrying the weight to the ground on 4x4s.

Obviously, the more you can slope the roof, the harder it is to build, the more dangerous the installation of roofing materials, and the better it will shed snow (or rain).

/edit and the minimum mfg recommended pitch for most roofing materials is 3/12. With a 12' span, that means one side 3' higher than the other, minimum. Easiest way to accomplish that would be to buy 4x4x8's for one side, and 4x4x12s for the other, setting them 2.5' deep. I think 3' is the recommended depth, don't know your soil conditions, but at least that way, the shallow side is still 5' in the air, so you needn't duck too much. If you want more height, or need to bury further, get 10's and 14's. You could do it with just three 4x4s on each side (total of 6), but you should add bracing to restrict their wont to twist.
 
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Chickenman MAN

Songster
Oct 25, 2020
609
649
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United Kingdom South Devon
My husband and I built a 12x20 pallet run for our ducks (fully secured all around with hardware cloth). We decided to do like a circus tent type roof with a large tarp, but after some heavy snow last week, realized it wasn't going to work--no matter how frequently we scraped the snow off the roof.

Today MA is expecting a bit of snow and while our ducks are currently secure in our chicken run, we're trying to come up with affordable ways to re-roof. Are PVC pipes a realistic option? I see a lot of hoop runs made with them, but I'm not sure of the mechanics behind them so I can't make the argument to my husband that PVC pipes are a good option (1" 10' pipes are a hell of a lot cheaper than the nine 2x4x16 boards we are discussing).

Anyway, hoping to get some ideas on what to do. Thanks!
Here is what I'd do in your situation! A few options:
- Make a frame (that is angled down on one side) from second hand scaffolding pipe (metal), I don't think PVC or the connectives would be strong enough. This is relatively cheap. Then buy polycarbonate roofing or metal roofing sheets secondhand, again, relatively cheap, and install.
- Or do the same but with a wooden frame and roof. You can buy recycled or second hand wood, though some sleepers may need to be bought. You can use pallet wood, big 6 by 3 feet pallets or larger would work fabulously. Make sure to stain or paint it though, and put the sleepers about 1 foot down in concrete.

Hope this helps!
 

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