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Sanitizing an inherited coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by JayRodNU, Mar 23, 2015.

  1. JayRodNU

    JayRodNU Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 13, 2015
    The house we bought came with a coop and run already built. But I hink it's possible the previous owner never cleaned it...ever. (Poor chickens). I have already raked and shoveled it out and then taken a shop vac to it to rid it of the Indiana Jones style spider webs. I'm looking for tips on what to do next. I plan to scrape down the walls. I have read that I should probably sanitize it perhaps with a partial bleach solution. How clean do I need to aim for? I know it doesn't have to be perfect since the new girls will just mess it up too but I don't want them catching something from the previous owners flock. It's my first time raising chickens so I want to be sure I'm providing them a good home. Here are a few pictures of the present state of things...[​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    If you do plan to use it at all, I'd use Virkon to sanitize it or even Oxine, but shipping on Virkon is much cheaper since Oxine comes in gallon jugs. Virkon comes in tablet form (can buy on Amazon), each highly concentrated one making a pint of solution. Some things will be difficult to really clean, like wood that soaked up years of poop. I hope if I ever move, it will not have a coop because I'd probably tear it down rather than take the chance.

    http://www2.dupont.com/Virkon_S/en_GB/index.html

    I now use the Virkon in spray bottles for folks to spray their shoes when they come here.



    ETA: those roosts are only big enough for bantams. You'll need bigger ones for large fowl. 2x3 or 2x4 at least with the wide side for them to roost on-chickens don't grip with their back toes the same as wild birds do.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
  3. torilovessmiles

    torilovessmiles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 19, 2014
    Central West Virginia
    [​IMG]
    In addition to what speckled hen said, I'd consider replacing those rotten boards. I'm not sure how far through it is, but if it's deteriorated enough, a determined predator could probably break their way through pretty easily. If it's just decorative paneling, though, I wouldn't worry about it. Rip it off if you want, the chickens don't mind!
    [​IMG]
    Otherwise it seems nicely designed and I'm sure your chickens will be very happy with it when you're done! :)
     
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    southern Michigan
    Welcome! I'd be very leary about the coop; if you can find out how long age chickens lived in it, that would be very good information.. Some diseases will linger for a very long time. Bleach is cheap and effective after the grunge is cleaned out. I totally agree about the roosts and condition of the walls. If no chickens have been in it for many years, it may be worth repairing. Mary
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I was also thinking that what you sanitize and keep might be worth considering painting with semi gloss paint. You can get mis-mixed Oops paint at Lowes and Home Depot for very cheap. It will seal in whatever else might be lurking, especially on wood surfaces that absorb stuff.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
    1 person likes this.

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