Sanity check my 14x20ft half-roofed run plans please?

Popsikle

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Oct 12, 2021
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While I do love good tool talk (I have mostly DW cordless, including my new 30deg framing nailer, but also working on a mix of air driven tools for bigger projects), I was wondering a bit more about anchoring.

So far, thanks to y'all the plan is a bit different, going with 18" OC 2x6 rafters with purloins (I like the deck boarding option a lot, we will see what the lumber yard has handy) and I've updated the beams to 2x6 from 4x4 (I think a double 2x6 might be overkill, not sure yet). Also, unsure what slope I'm going to settle with, sort of depends on how hardcore I have to anchor, and how often I want to scrape the snow off when it really comes down (I already have to do this with other things, so its not really a big deal to me lol).

Now about anchoring the thing down..... there are giant multi ton boulders about 6-12 inches under my lawn, I do have a kubota with a backhoe I use for digging, and I have a post hole digger for it but digging any sort of hole even with big equipment sucks lol. I am currently thinking I just need to do it, and get over the dread factor lol, but what do yall think?
 

3KillerBs

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While I do love good tool talk (I have mostly DW cordless, including my new 30deg framing nailer, but also working on a mix of air driven tools for bigger projects), I was wondering a bit more about anchoring.

So far, thanks to y'all the plan is a bit different, going with 18" OC 2x6 rafters with purloins (I like the deck boarding option a lot, we will see what the lumber yard has handy) and I've updated the beams to 2x6 from 4x4 (I think a double 2x6 might be overkill, not sure yet). Also, unsure what slope I'm going to settle with, sort of depends on how hardcore I have to anchor, and how often I want to scrape the snow off when it really comes down (I already have to do this with other things, so its not really a big deal to me lol).

Now about anchoring the thing down..... there are giant multi ton boulders about 6-12 inches under my lawn, I do have a kubota with a backhoe I use for digging, and I have a post hole digger for it but digging any sort of hole even with big equipment sucks lol. I am currently thinking I just need to do it, and get over the dread factor lol, but what do yall think?

I'm sorry, I'm on sand in the south with effectively no frostline.

Maybe get advice from your local Ag agent? Or check your town's codes for outbuildings?
 

U_Stormcrow

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While I do love good tool talk (I have mostly DW cordless, including my new 30deg framing nailer, but also working on a mix of air driven tools for bigger projects), I was wondering a bit more about anchoring.

So far, thanks to y'all the plan is a bit different, going with 18" OC 2x6 rafters with purloins (I like the deck boarding option a lot, we will see what the lumber yard has handy) and I've updated the beams to 2x6 from 4x4 (I think a double 2x6 might be overkill, not sure yet). Also, unsure what slope I'm going to settle with, sort of depends on how hardcore I have to anchor, and how often I want to scrape the snow off when it really comes down (I already have to do this with other things, so its not really a big deal to me lol).

Now about anchoring the thing down..... there are giant multi ton boulders about 6-12 inches under my lawn, I do have a kubota with a backhoe I use for digging, and I have a post hole digger for it but digging any sort of hole even with big equipment sucks lol. I am currently thinking I just need to do it, and get over the dread factor lol, but what do yall think?

Assuming you can't drill and set masonry bolts in those stones, and simply chain the thing down, I'm not hearing other options.

and I have clay-y sands and sandy-clays - I LOVE my Rotary Hammer, but there are plenty of rocks I won't put it to. The native limestone, sure - like butter. But you have some form of igneous rock, likely high mica content granite, right? NOT for drilling with hand tools, no matter how many amp they pull.
 

mowin

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While I do love good tool talk (I have mostly DW cordless, including my new 30deg framing nailer, but also working on a mix of air driven tools for bigger projects), I was wondering a bit more about anchoring.

So far, thanks to y'all the plan is a bit different, going with 18" OC 2x6 rafters with purloins (I like the deck boarding option a lot, we will see what the lumber yard has handy) and I've updated the beams to 2x6 from 4x4 (I think a double 2x6 might be overkill, not sure yet). Also, unsure what slope I'm going to settle with, sort of depends on how hardcore I have to anchor, and how often I want to scrape the snow off when it really comes down (I already have to do this with other things, so its not really a big deal to me lol).

Now about anchoring the thing down..... there are giant multi ton boulders about 6-12 inches under my lawn, I do have a kubota with a backhoe I use for digging, and I have a post hole digger for it but digging any sort of hole even with big equipment sucks lol. I am currently thinking I just need to do it, and get over the dread factor lol, but what do yall think?
I can't use a post hole digger at my place. Have you use a mini excavator to dig anything around here. Lots of rocks 2' ish in size
That said, if your boulders are literally the size of a Buick, then pinning the post to the boulder is the easiest method. Most rental places will have the a rotary hammer with bits.
 

U_Stormcrow

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I can't use a post hole digger at my place. Have you use a mini excavator to dig anything around here. Lots of rocks 2' ish in size
That said, if your boulders are literally the size of a Buick, then pinning the post to the boulder is the easiest method. Most rental places will have the a rotary hammer with bits.
good idea, use THEIR BITS! :yesss:

Get some cutting oil, too. Chances are, someone else used their bits for the same reason before.
 

mowin

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good idea, use THEIR BITS! :yesss:

Get some cutting oil, too. Chances are, someone else used their bits for the same reason before.
Water is all that's needed. Mainly need to keep the bit cool. I ended up buying my own rotary hammer used. Bits are not cheap, but I know there sharp and not abused.
 

U_Stormcrow

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Water is all that's needed. Mainly need to keep the bit cool. I ended up buying my own rotary hammer used. Bits are not cheap, but I know there sharp and not abused.
I used bar and chain oil - always have a few gallons handy. Water is fine for shallow drilling and mortar or fresh 'crete, but even drilling 3/4" dia holes to 7" depth in fresh 'crete, I was having problems keeping things cool, and I had more than 100 holes to drill.

You have fewer holes, may not be worth the invesment.
 

mowin

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I used bar and chain oil - always have a few gallons handy. Water is fine for shallow drilling and mortar or fresh 'crete, but even drilling 3/4" dia holes to 7" depth in fresh 'crete, I was having problems keeping things cool, and I had more than 100 holes to drill.

You have fewer holes, may not be worth the invesment.
My dad was a machinist/tool and die maker. He drilled into my head, see what I did there, the importance of oil in drilling. Bar and chain oil is a great option as it's relatively inexpensive. For a few holes, water will be ok if you keep it flowing. Bar oil would definitely be better if doing 100 holes.
 

Popsikle

Frozen Treat on a Stick
Premium Feather Member
Oct 12, 2021
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Northern New JErsey
I can't use a post hole digger at my place. Have you use a mini excavator to dig anything around here. Lots of rocks 2' ish in size
That said, if your boulders are literally the size of a Buick, then pinning the post to the boulder is the easiest method. Most rental places will have the a rotary hammer with bits.
Yeaaaaaaaa they are like the iceberg that sunk the titanic. It looks like large but overcomeable size rock for the backhoe on my tractor but I would end up excavating a 6ft perimeter and pulling basically a car out of the ground. Makes for good paintball shelter in the woods!

I think my concern is that while rock like that is common, and I really won't know until I start digging so sounds like I need to just get cracking and determine what's going to work best for each post. Uniformity is overrated anyway!!
 

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