Save The House Sparrows (STHS)

Status
Not open for further replies.

ChicknsRock

Crowing
6 Years
Oct 4, 2013
15,335
113
318
Save the House Sparrows...
.....before it's too late.​
Years ago, English House Sparrows were captured, caged, put on ships, sailed to North America and let loose. Since then, House Sparrows have not been getting along so well with humankind.
They say house sparrows are a pest to other birds, and that they rob the nests of native birds and are extremely messy in bird houses. That may be true, but it is a good enough reason for people to be killing these innocent birds? NO.
People also fill their bird feeders with striped sunflower seeds to discourage house sparrows from eating out of them.
And when they find a female house sparrow innocently setting on her eggs in a bird house, they kill her and break her eggs.
I'm sure if their was any way house sparrows could be discouraged from bathing in birdbaths, such people would do whatever it took to do so.
"Many people regard House Sparrows as undesirables in their yards, since they aren't native and can be a menace to native species. ..."
-- allaboutbirds.com

Why are house sparrows treated so cruelly? Because they're not native birds? Because they use bird houses meant for other birds, when, I never heard of a blue jay being killed because he was robbing a nest.
These birds are declining.
"The plucky house sparrow is one of the most widespread birds in the world, having been introduced in so many places that it is often considered an invasive species. Ironically, however, its population is experiencing serious decline in many of its native regions."
-- birding.about.com

However, do you think people are worried about the decline of the house sparrows? No. They aren't. In fact, the IUCN labels the house sparrow as Least Concern.


It's time for us to do something about this. These birds do not deserve to become extinct because we so cruelly murder them and ban them from housing and feeders. If you would like to become a part of Save The House Sparrows, thumb-up this post and start helping the birds! And not just house sparrows, but all of the wildlife out there who need our help. You can start by putting up birdhouses in your yard, and allow house sparrows to nest in them. They probably won't take all of the houses. Fill your feeders with sunflower seeds, millet and milo, the house sparrows' favorite.
If you really care about the welfare of wildlife, stop the killing of these declining birds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicknsRock

Some of us believe that the Spirit is breathed into all living creatures to include but not limited to mankind. Those who believe this also know the great pains that one special man went through in order to save those of the animal kingdom a long time ago. His name was Noah and his craft was found as evidence that his story is true. Those who believe this also believe that the animals are under a state of total grace and can do no wrong. To address the issue of the barn being overcome with annoying wild birds, this can be resolved with introducing fresh felines who will readily take on the task of "pest control". This is the most natural and efficient way to deal with this situation. We allow rat snakes to roam freely on our property to make their living in our feed sheds in order to control the mice population; we too have cats that are 16 years old this year and still are avid mousers but not as efficient as they once were.
All animals have their place in the ecosystem just as all organs have their role and are connected in the human body. We introduce species that are not indigenous all the time; the sparrow does not deserve the savage indictment that it receives. We all need to be reminded, those of us who believe, that God's eye is on the sparrow. Why was this particular bird chosen as an example for His care and providence for us? Is it because sparrows are found all over the world in every country and civilization not unlike mankind?





P.S. Any abusive or offensive talk or behavior here about house sparrows is PROHIBITED on this thread. If you don't like house sparrows, then get on somewhere.
 
Last edited:

chooks4life

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 8, 2013
4,905
655
296
Australia
I wonder why they're declining so steeply. When I was growing up in Australia there were house sparrows everywhere, and we lived all over Australia, traveled a lot, and nowhere did I not see a resident population.

I've gone more than a decade without seeing a single one in any of the places I lived in a few different states of Aus. Recently I saw some, for one breeding season, but they failed to breed for some reason, and were replaced by Indian Mynahs. The "Flying Canetoads" which I now see everywhere, which are known to destroy adult birds, their nests, and their chicks.

Maybe the Mynahs are the reason we no longer have them? I'm sure some resident populations exist somewhere but from being a booming introduced species they are now a rarity and novelty. Whereas the Mynahs are everywhere. Used to see European Starlings too, but haven't in over a decade.
 

ChicknsRock

Crowing
6 Years
Oct 4, 2013
15,335
113
318
I wonder why they're declining so steeply. When I was growing up in Australia there were house sparrows everywhere, and we lived all over Australia, traveled a lot, and nowhere did I not see a resident population.

I've gone more than a decade without seeing a single one in any of the places I lived in a few different states of Aus. Recently I saw some, for one breeding season, but they failed to breed for some reason, and were replaced by Indian Mynahs. The "Flying Canetoads" which I now see everywhere, which are known to destroy adult birds, their nests, and their chicks.

Maybe the Mynahs are the reason we no longer have them? I'm sure some resident populations exist somewhere but from being a booming introduced species they are now a rarity and novelty. Whereas the Mynahs are everywhere. Used to see European Starlings too, but haven't in over a decade.
European Starlings are having the same problem as the house sparrows, and if I'm not mistaken they are declining in population too.
 

chooks4life

Crowing
6 Years
Apr 8, 2013
4,905
655
296
Australia
European Starlings are having the same problem as the house sparrows, and if I'm not mistaken they are declining in population too.
Interesting. When I was a kid the public information on Euro Starlings was that they were terrible, destructive pests, spearheading extinctions of natives.

Maybe these very invasive and usually urbanized pest species are suffering because they survive on largely human food items, like white bread and chips and other crap? The insects they can access in suburbia are more likely to be poisoned than not, in some places.
 

DurhamDuck

Songster
8 Years
Mar 26, 2011
413
15
121
Durham, Connecticut
House sparrows should be allowed to reproduce freely- on their own turf.

Bluebirds and others nearly went extinct because of them. If it were not from people destroying the nest, bluebirds and other species would be history by now. They need to go (in America anyway.)
 

Bunnylady

POOF Goes the Pooka
10 Years
Nov 27, 2009
18,541
8,241
591
Wilmington, NC
There's something about looking into a nest box and seeing 6 almost-ready-to-fledge chickadee nestlings that have been pecked to death by a male House Sparrow that makes one feel a little less than charitable toward the species . . . .
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom