Scaly Leg Mites - Need Best / Easiest / Quickest Solution - Scaley

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Nifty-Chicken, Feb 18, 2008.

  1. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

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    I was given a trio of white silkies a couple of weeks ago that had the most HIDEOUS overgorwn mites on their legs. Their scales were lifted up so high from mites that you couldn't even see some of their toes and their leg shanks looked twice as big. I asked a chicken friend what to do and she brought out some ivomec injectible and put a couple drops in each bird's mouth and told me to go home and rub their legs with vaseline all the way up and a little into the feathered part. I didn't have any vaseline so I used an old jar of Vicks Vapo Rub. She said to repeat the vaseline a few times, but honestly I haven't had time, and their feet look SO much better you wouldn't believe it. I was just looking at them a couple days ago and only the roo has a few overgrown scales on his legs and feet. The hens look like brand new. I was amazed. Good luck with it. Your case doesn't look anywhere NEAR as bad as the birds that I just cleared up. Don't skip the ivomec. I think that is what did most of it.
     
  2. NiftyChick

    NiftyChick Songster

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    I think we always assumed the ivomec had to be injected via needle so that kind of scared us....mouth droppers we could probably do. Any idea where to find the stuff?
     
    Feather Hearts likes this.
  3. goatfarmer98

    goatfarmer98 Hatching

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    I have read all of the posts concerning scaly leg mites and treatments. However, I have about 125 free range birds of which I sell every egg collected. I have some birds showing symptoms of scaly leg mites and need to treat them as well as the remainder of the flock. However, several of you have mentioned the hazards of chemicals of which is a major concern of mine because of my egg sales. Individually treating each bird would be a major undertaking. So I have been thinking and let me run this past this list. How about a large and shallow plastic container for a foot bath of which the birds would have to walk through each time entering or leaving their portion of the barn? A chute could easily be made as well as closing off some their entrance way so they do not try to jump or fly over the bath. NOW the question of the day is what alternatives do I have to put into the bath? Vegetable oil? Has anyone tried this method? Thank you all for your thoughts and suggestions.
     
  4. Nifty-Chicken

    Nifty-Chicken Administrator

    Very interesting idea!

    I've got no experience, but here's my two cents:

    A long and wide plastic container as you suggested. Deep enough to get as much of the legs covered as possible, but shallow enough that they don't drown / get stuck. I'd put a board or fence or something about a foot overhead so they couldn't jump / fly over it.

    I'd fill it with baby / mineral oil. I'd start with the container just barely filled, then over time slowly increase it so 1) they get use to it and 2) so you know how deep is too deep.
     
  5. goatfarmer98

    goatfarmer98 Hatching

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    Nifty:
    Thanks for your quick reply and moderating this forum.
    My chickens walk and scratch in mud puddles during hurricanes (two days while feeding them one chicken quietly thanked me for permitting them to have the run of the farm) so I dont think I'll have too many not willing to walk through a 4 - 5 inch deep container, similar to shallow storage containers that would slide beneath a bed sold at most stores. I believe they'll cooperate with a modest chute into and over the container as they enter and leave their portion of the barn.
    Why BABY or MINERAL OIL? I was thinking of cost as I easily would go through a few gallons of this foot bath solution. You feelings on vegetable oil, which is readily available in quantity, safe for chickens, eggs, and environment, and relatively inexpensive.
     
  6. onthespot

    onthespot Deluxe Dozens

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    Welcome to BYC!!!

    If I was going to go this route, which I think is brillieant, by the way, i would re-use restaurant deep fry canola oil. They give it away by the five and ten gallons at a time, it is safe for the chickens to taste, you could filter it and turn it into biodiesel when you are done, so you can run back to the restaurant and get you some more! [​IMG]
     
  7. goatfarmer98

    goatfarmer98 Hatching

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    ON: Great idea. Thanks for the suggestion and welcome.
     
  8. bigzio

    bigzio Crowing

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    goatfarmer98...[​IMG] sounds like a good idea to increase the depth slowly no matter what oil you decide to use.

    Please keep us posted with the results!

    bigzio
     
  9. Put baby oil in a container deep enough to get the entire leg and foot into. Stick the leg and foot in the oil and hold it there for about 10 seconds. The mites will be suffocated by the oil and the oil is good for their poor itches.

    The coop must be completely cleaned and debugged, or you will be dipping feet and legs for a month.

    I sure hope you don't have a lot of chickens, since this will have to be done EVERY week for a month or so.

    Please do not spray W-D 40 on them, it is nasty stuff to put on an animal.......
     
  10. FisherMOM

    FisherMOM Songster

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    This thread has been very helpful... I almost think that it should be a sticky post!

    I am guessing that my d'uccles have leg mites. [​IMG] what a pain it was putting Vaseline on feathered legs tonight.
    I think I will need to get horse dewormer or something instead.
     

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