serious pecking problem

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by maryzee, Mar 3, 2014.

  1. maryzee

    maryzee Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 3, 2013
    I know I've posted a couple of times the last few weeks but I really don't know what else to do!
    My Hamburg is getting pecked repeatedly by the 3 isa Browns, she now is bald on her back, tail and vent area, and with bloody wounds. I have caught the hens doing it and tried everything recommended, mustard on the hens back, purple spray, no peck spray, put up a mirror and swing and dangled old cds from the roof to distract them, throw scraps daily but I just don't know how to stop them and my poor hen is getting pecked to bits. What can I do? I would really appreciate some advice at all. They live in a large pen with coop (lot of foxes in the area so cannot free range).
     
  2. ellie32526

    ellie32526 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 21, 2012
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    Is there any way you can separate them? This would give the Hamburg a chance to recoup and re-grow some feathers. If you can divide the pen so they can still see each other but not be able to hurt her they might get used to her and not peck at her, then re-introduce her after her feathers have regrown and do it at night while they are roosting.
     
  3. Puddin Fluff

    Puddin Fluff Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 30, 2012
    River Valley, AR

    Is there any way you can separate them? This would give the Hamburg a chance to recoup and re-grow some feathers. If you can divide the pen so they can still see each other but not be able to hurt her they might get used to her and not peck at her, then re-introduce her after her feathers have regrown and do it at night while they are roosting.
    [/quote

    Ditto. You also might put her in a cage inside the coop/run to keepbthem from being able to peck her.

    The problem is that once hens begin this behavior it is very htprd to break and you may have to simply find her a new home after she has recovered.

    Good luck
     

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