sevin dust question

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Elly, Aug 27, 2008.

  1. Elly

    Elly Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 18, 2008
    I read past post and havn't been able to find an answer to my question. I'm only a newbie at this so have a question about lice/mites. Should the hens be treated on a regular schedule with this dust or only when the mites/lice are seen.?

    When dusting the coop and nest boxs do you just leave it in the shavings/straw?

    Can the eggs be eatten after the dust has been put in the boxs?

    Could the dust get in the food/water if spread on the ground and the hens scratch the shavings?

    Sorry for all the questions and thanks for all the help.

    elly:rolleyes:
     
  2. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    If you want to treat & prevent infestation- treat them on a regular basis- every 2-4 weeks. If you want to treat when you see mites- do it, and repeat in 2 weeks. If you are the sort that likes prevention, then think about deworming and treating for mites on a regular basis (kind of like putting flea control on the cat monthly to prevent fleas from infesting the cat and house-even if you never see them). If you are the sort that likes to have evidence of a problem before you take action, then wait till you see the bugs.... I try to powder everyone every month, sometimes I miss. I just hate to see gobs of lice (and fleas, ect).

    Carbaryl powder and it's cousin pyrethrin powder are topical products, they are also sold with a different label to put on vegetable crops to control insects- wash before eating (the veggies). If there ends up being some powder on an egg shell, it won't penetrate- don't eat the shell & wash your hands. Wear gloves when powdering chickens. Also sold as flea powder for dogs with a different label.

    People put/mix the stuff in dirt dust baths for chickens so they can powder themselves as well.
    Jess
     
  3. cgmccary

    cgmccary Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 14, 2007
    NE Alabama
    Did you read this recent post where this was discussed at great length & exhaustively?

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=83208

    I personally do not treat for mites, worms, or anything else unless I see a problem. Others treat as part of their routine. There is no right or wrong answer to your question except IF YOU DO SEE MITES, then TREAT accordingly.

    Mites can quickly kill a bird . Mites/lice can also move rapidly through your flock. Some areas of the U.S. are more susceptible to mites and worms than other areas. For instance, hot & humid regions should be on a higher alert for these pests. Dry, arid regions-- less of a problem.

    Scaly leg mites move more slowly through the flock but are nevertheless, pernicious. I have used Campho-phenique for scaley leg mites very effectively. Apply on the legs and shanks with an eye-dropper, between the toes covering all the scales. Rub in real good. repeat in a few days to a week.

    Be careful about introducing new birds to your flock as this is how mites usually get their start (the other way being wild birds). Worms usually take advantage of your birds when there is some other problem. Normally, there should be a balance in your chicken run environment with worms and chickens. If you see them in stools, then you have a problem. Worming is hard on birds so that is why I don't treat as routine. Ivermectin kills all except a tapeworm (rather rare), but you should be very careful usuing the product & read up first:

    http://shilala.homestead.com/ivomec.html

    I hope this helps. I'm not trying to start a debate on any of this but just answering the question in my experience and opinion.
     
  4. Elly

    Elly Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 18, 2008
    thanks so much for the info. I think I'll just keep an eye out for the nasty bugs and when I find them I'll treat them.

    If I don't have the lice or mites now...how could they get into my coop if I don't introduce any new chickens?

    Again thanks for the insite
     
  5. cgmccary

    cgmccary Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 14, 2007
    NE Alabama
    other than inroducing new birds to your flock, only by wild birds having access to your run or coop (Starlings, Sparrows)-- during migration, flocks of wild birds in trees overhead. If you want to introduce new birds start with newly hatched chicks.
     

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