JadeFarms

Free Ranging
May 3, 2019
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So the way you tell gender is comb size and stance. Males have large combs, females don’t and males stand upright.

At 12 to 14 weeks cockerels get saddle feathers and males have pointy hackles. I would just wait on the black until he’s a little older. And I agree that the browns a female.
 

JadeFarms

Free Ranging
May 3, 2019
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Here are some more pictures! Yeah the far left black one (Barbara Jean LOL) and middle one (Sour Diesel) I was sure were cockerels and knew that the buff (Bubba) was pullet, but after reading comments and unsure of the two on the far right!
In this pic he seems to have a single comb, maybe he has a messed up single. He does seem to have thick legs which a lot of the times males have. But pullets do have thicker legs sometimes too.
 

Chicalina

Crowing
Aug 1, 2020
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I can just tell,
#1 young pullets have different faces than cocks.
#2 Pullets and cockerels stand different, pullets crouch, and cocks stand more upright.
Sometimes, and #2 especially so with silkies, but....imo 5 weeks is too young in many breeds to tell based on stance and faces.

Some breeds you can tell on comb and wattles but not all. And some on feathering up. E.g. girls often get tail feathers earlier than boys. But polish feather up quicker than other breeds and silkies later. Wyandottes get redder combs at a younger age than most other breeds so girls can be mistaken for boys.

There is no exact science, until they start laying eggs, lol. Even hens crow sometimes. And in some breeds the hackles are pointy in pullets.

I know what you mean though about "I can just tell". I often get a 6th sense and can't put my finger on exactly why I know its a boy or girl. Just "something" about them! 😂

It is a fun game though. And very frustrating having to wait and see.
 
Sep 13, 2019
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Sometimes, and #2 especially so with silkies, but....imo 5 weeks is too young in many breeds to tell based on stance and faces.

Some breeds you can tell on comb and wattles but not all. And some on feathering up. E.g. girls often get tail feathers earlier than boys. But polish feather up quicker than other breeds and silkies later. Wyandottes get redder combs at a younger age than most other breeds so girls can be mistaken for boys.

There is no exact science, until they start laying eggs, lol. Even hens crow sometimes. And in some breeds the hackles are pointy in pullets.

I know what you mean though about "I can just tell". I often get a 6th sense and can't put my finger on exactly why I know its a boy or girl. Just "something" about them! 😂

It is a fun game though. And very frustrating having to wait and see.
I'm glad you share my opinion, plus little roos are rowdier and sound slightly different.
 

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