Shippings eggs for hatching

Fishkeeper

Crowing
Oct 30, 2017
2,345
4,916
286
Central Texas
Oh, wow, penedesenca eggs are a really interesting color. That does look like a different pigment, my bad. I didn't know eggs came in purplish. You could probably still get dark eggs out of a cross between the two, but it might take more work. Just imagine an egg with high-quality levels of both pigments! That thing would be so dark.
 

ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
9 Years
Nov 23, 2010
29,359
19,040
867
St. Louis, MO
Well that was what I was hoping with the Welsummer cross but it didn't happen and she died from heat one summer. I've since gotten rid of all my other breeds through attrition and now only keep and breed Penedesencas.
You know how the blue pigment is throughout the shell on blue, green and olive eggs? Well, I've had Penedesenca eggs that had some brown pigment inside as well. Not a lot but it definitely wasn't a coating applied after the shell was formed. With most brown eggs you can wash and scrape the brown off. Much of the time washing eggs doesn't remove much if any of these pigments.
Regarding the purplish thing. I usually get some plum eggs (probably from the same hens) but to my understanding that is from an additional coating of calcium after the pigment is applied.
 

RIR0BCM

Songster
5 Years
Nov 7, 2014
275
31
131
Wow ..so much information !! Thanks :)
maybe i will try to work with the bloodlines that we have here ....

It can be interesting
 

Fishkeeper

Crowing
Oct 30, 2017
2,345
4,916
286
Central Texas
X2
For roosters, I only keep those from the darkest eggs. He should pass that on to his daughters.
I don't think that's entirely how that works. I could take a Marans hen who lays very dark eggs and breed her with a rooster of a breed that lays white eggs, and she would continue to lay very dark eggs, but the resulting offspring wouldn't. The only thing that affects the darkness of the egg is the genetics of the hen that laid it. Yes, roosters hatched from darker eggs are more likely to produce offspring that lay dark eggs, but it's because of the genetics of the rooster's mother. A hen who lays dark eggs is more likely to produce roosters whose offspring lay dark eggs, but a dark egg doesn't guarantee a dark-egg-gene rooster.
 

ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
9 Years
Nov 23, 2010
29,359
19,040
867
St. Louis, MO
I don't think that's entirely how that works. I could take a Marans hen who lays very dark eggs and breed her with a rooster of a breed that lays white eggs, and she would continue to lay very dark eggs, but the resulting offspring wouldn't. The only thing that affects the darkness of the egg is the genetics of the hen that laid it. Yes, roosters hatched from darker eggs are more likely to produce offspring that lay dark eggs, but it's because of the genetics of the rooster's mother. A hen who lays dark eggs is more likely to produce roosters whose offspring lay dark eggs, but a dark egg doesn't guarantee a dark-egg-gene rooster.
I think that's just what I said, not in so many words.
 

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