Should I accept a dog?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Ole rooster, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I emailed my daughter in law today asked if she my son still had goats. And if so what breed of dogs they were using. I thought they had some type of shepherd. She sent back an email telling me they didn't have goats anymore but did have chickens. They also had 2 Pyrenees guarding the chickens. She also they were good to watch out for coyotes. They had already kill one.

    But my point here is she said they didn't need 2. If I wanted one of them I was welcome to come get it. It's trained with chickens already so that would be taken care of. My concern would be fencing. I have 19 acres but no fencing. I read these dogs are bad to roam. I would love to have the dog but not if I can't keep it home without fence. Do I have to have fence?
     
  2. nickie

    nickie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't know a thing about pyrenees, but I do know that if you don't have a fence (to be a respectful and responsible dog owner) you need a chain. You can't get a dog and let it roam free. I know a lot of people do that, but no one likes some one else's dog crapping in their yard or just wondering about their property. Sorry.
     
  3. Felony

    Felony Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't have personnal experience with pyrenese moutain dogs but I would of thought they would naturally stay around their home to protect it. I would of thought they were the opposite of roaming dogs, but I'm sure someone with a dog of this breed will be in a better position to tell you!

    My first thought though was that for your peace of mind and for your dog's own protection it would be better if you had a fence in case he had something to follow out of your boundaries. How could he know what the lines of the properties are?? I know you can purchase electric collar for that purpose. I am a positive reinforcment advocate but I know in a circumstance where it would be impossible for you to fence all that acreage, it would probably be a good option, if used properly. The dog would learn fast the boundaries and the pain of the shock would not be associated with you. I think it's the only tool that uses pain as a way to teach a dog something i'm ok with, on a big acrage like yours...and for the dog's own safety! Of course if you have money and time to fence, then I would say go for it!
     
  4. Felony

    Felony Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think if a dog was used to protect a flock or a herd on a farm....if it's on a chain it cannot serve it's purpose. A smart predator will soon figure out the dog is not a threath, since...he's on a chain!! But I do agree with you, as dog owners we're responsible of our dogs and it should not be an option that they will go off on someone else's property! That can also result in losing your dog to someone shooting it or bringing it to a careless pound that will euthanize it if you're not fast enough....(at least in our shitty province of Quebec canada where animal welfare is really not of great importance)
     
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  5. peteyfoozer

    peteyfoozer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would absolutely not have a Great Pyrenees without adequate fencing. Part of what an LGD does is establish a perimeter and patrol. If there is no fence, his perimeters are going to go well beyond your established boundaries and could endanger the dog by taking him into traffic, or neighboring property where he is not welcome. LGD's are not like other dogs, and won't just stay home because they love you. I have 2 Maremmas, I can let them loose only because we live on 250,000 acres and there are no roads or neighbors, but I still have fencing to contain them when I need to. They are wonderful dogs, but only under the right circumstances.
     
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  6. nickie

    nickie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That was exactly my point. Can't guard the flock if he's on a chain, but can't be a responsible owner without containing an outside dog. I have dogs, I live in a rural (very), farming community, lots of dogs roam here. Wild dogs are a huge problem because people have not spayed or nuetered their dogs and then let them roam... I don't know if the mutt trotting through the field is someone's dog out for a mud bath and manure roll or if its wild. If you get a dog, contain it responsibly.
     
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  7. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Invisible fencing doesn't work for all dogs. Plus, it doesn't keep the neighbor's dogs out. Many dogs will charge through an IF without a second thought if they are in pursuit of something. Fence the area you need for your livestock and go from there. Also, 19 acres is a bit much for an invisible fence. The wires need to be checked on a regular basis as they are actually kind of fragile. Tree roots, freezing temperatures, digging rodents are just a few of the things that can break the wire. And 1 break and the entire system quits. Also, IFs take a LOT of training before you can leave the dog outside unattended, several weeks if not a couple of months.

    GPs ARE known for staying at home, but that "home" has traditionally meant 50+ to hundreds of acres where they followed the sheep and goats. So, on small rural farms, they will often decide that they need to patrol the entire neighborhood if you don't keep them contained. The problem with that is that they might decide that the neighbor's new dog is a threat and kill it. The same goes for any neighborhood dog that wanders into your yard (see above about IFs not keeping out other dogs)

    Since the dog is already proven good with chickens, then go for it if you are interested. But definitely figure out how to keep the dog contained. Perimeter training (teaching the dog to remember your property line) can work in some cases but again is a very labor intensive task and not 100%. Again, in the heat of pursuit dogs often forget what they've learned.
     
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  8. watchdogps

    watchdogps Chillin' With My Peeps

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    x2
     
  9. yomama

    yomama Overrun With Chickens

    I think you've received some very good, reasonable advice. I agree as well. If you choose to get this dog, I would fence what you can. It keeps your new dog in, and other things out (hopefully). Please, please, please don't chain it. I know there will probably be many folks that will disagree with me, but chaining a dog changes it. I've worked with dogs for years, and I've seen it numerous times. I understand some people who have absolutely no other option, but it really is a bad choice, if you can help it. Besides, as Felony mentioned, he won't be much of a guard dog, if limited to a chain. From what I've seen here on BYC, GPs are a chicken protector favorite. Sounds like you've got a good opportunity to have a good chicken, as well as property, guard. I'd fence as much as you can. Doesn't have to be a fancy 6' cedar fencing. You can put field fencing up quite economically. Good luck! [​IMG]
     
  10. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Milner, Georgia
    I think I must have misstated my question. I've owned and trained dogs most all my life. True, mostly Dobermans, but dogs still. I presently have a dog I found on county road here and he does not stay on a chain. He has a few houses he visits but not what you are calling a "roamer". A chain is out. No way is that even an option.

    It does look though that the Pyrenees is not going to work here. I cannot fence my 19 acres. If you could see the lower 6 acres you could see why. Partly springs starting a creek and is the boundary. My main issue is Morgan is only 64 lbs. He would take on a coyote but I just don't think he would win out. A dog over 120 lbs would. Oh well, I was just wonder if that breed would stay home.

    Thanks
     

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