should I cull 10-day old chick?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by teachermom24, May 13, 2011.

  1. teachermom24

    teachermom24 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 12, 2009
    We got 25 one-week-old Red Star pullets on Monday. Already on Tuesday, I was wondering about one that looked like it had "sticky butt". I cleaned it off and put it back in the brooder. Same thing on Wednesday and then I noticed its butt is just constantly irritated and gunky. Yesterday, I saw it was always standing off by itself and I thought some of the others were picking at it so I separated it from the rest in a small box. It does poop, though not a lot; chirps (more like a distress call calling out to the others); does not seem to be growing like the others.

    Should I cull this chick or keep it in the infirmary and see what happens?

    Thanks!

    Kathy
     
  2. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

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    The chirping is an indicator of distress, usually cold or lonely. The pasty butt is no fun to deal with, but some just seem prone to it. Most grow out of it. It does seem to affect the runts more!

    Given the situation, I would divide the brooder with wire (I use an old oven rack taped on edge.) and that way the chick isn't lonely or too hot/too cold. Then start giving a few drops of baby vitamins twice a day. A thorough washing of the bum and a little Blue-Kote would help, too.
    No treats, just chick starter and plain water.

    Best of luck!
     
  3. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Trouble is, we can only tell you what we would do. I would probably try some neosporin on the butt, both to help heal and to help keep the poop from sticking. And some organic ACV in the water, as I've read this helps poopy butt. Maybe a little yogurt for the probiotics. I'd also put one other chick in with it; hopefully this will help the chirping.

    But that's me, only. If you said you felt it would be better to cull, maybe because you want a strong flock or something, I would certainly not argue with you. And I don't at all mean to be thoughtless or brush off your feelings. Some decisions are just not as pleasant as others -- well, some are downright hard! I sympathize with your dilemma, really.
     
  4. teachermom24

    teachermom24 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 12, 2009
    I'm not so concerned with having a strong flock--I don't have enough experience with chickens to know what might be a serious problem and what is curable. I'm glad to know Little Chick should be all right with some TLC. I also didn't know whether the chick had something contagious which was one reason to separate her from the others.

    Thanks for your help! (Now I'll go look up those medicines and treatments mentioned--I really am a "New Egg" [​IMG])

    Kathy
     

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