Should I get a polish chicken

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by clucker farms, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. clucker farms

    clucker farms Just Hatched

    30
    3
    14
    Jun 20, 2016
    I want a polish chicken but I don't know if they are a good breed or a bad breed.
     
  2. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

    11,244
    4,387
    466
    Mar 27, 2012
    Vermont
    My Coop
    :welcome!

    There's not really 'good' or 'bad' breeds, it all depends on what you're looking for. For instance, if you want a bird mostly for eye candy, then polish are for you. But they aren't the best layers, and they aren't very good for free ranging because their crests impair their vision so they can't see predators. In an environment where you can keep them safely in a run and you don't mind that they don't lay very large or very many eggs (there are some exceptions but you can't expect them to lay a lot of eggs for you), and you really like the way they look, then they would be good for you.
     
    3 people like this.
  3. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

    63,303
    7,813
    726
    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    Not certain what you mean by 'good' or 'bad' breed. What traits are you looking for in a bird that you add to your flock?
     
  4. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

    81,157
    8,281
    766
    Aug 26, 2009
    Out to pasture
    Same thing with silkies. Lots of people get them and are disappointed that they don't lay much, go broody a lot, are often bullied by other breeds AND sitting ducks for predators.

    They tend to be breeder favorites in terms of broody hens, and kids love them.
     
  5. Chicken Egg 17

    Chicken Egg 17 Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,438
    200
    201
    Dec 11, 2015
    McVeytown PA
    Hi and welcome to BYC I have not much info about he polish that hasn't already been said so wish you luck.
     
  6. clucker farms

    clucker farms Just Hatched

    30
    3
    14
    Jun 20, 2016
    I want it for more of eye candy. I will like to enter it into shows
     
  7. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life Out of the Woods Premium Member

    84,499
    3,781
    646
    Jun 15, 2012
    Washington
    Welcome to BYC! I'm glad you joined us! :)
     
  8. Yorkshire Coop

    Yorkshire Coop Moderator Staff Member

    17,704
    2,997
    451
    Aug 16, 2014
    Yorkshire, UK
    My Coop
  9. clucker farms

    clucker farms Just Hatched

    30
    3
    14
    Jun 20, 2016
    I have another question that is not on this topic but should I keep the light that keeps the chickens warm during the winter. I live in Georgia
     
  10. Yorkshire Coop

    Yorkshire Coop Moderator Staff Member

    17,704
    2,997
    451
    Aug 16, 2014
    Yorkshire, UK
    My Coop
    Once fully feathered chickens can cope with the cold remarkably well. Often they deal better with cold rather than heat. As long as your coop is well ventilated in the eaves and draft free they should do fine in the cold. For me no I would not keep the heat lamp on them over the winter. During the winter when they slow down with egg production this gives them a break from laying which for me is a good thing for my hens. I like them to have a break so they head into spring fully recharged in the egg laying department. If you keep the light on them this will keep them laying and for me this is not a natural thing. Some keepers do give extra light during the winter months to encourage laying but it really is an individual choice.

    Here are some articles on winter keeping and adding light during the winter months ~ https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/housing-and-feeding-your-chickens
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by