Should I make a coop with separate pens and runs for roosters and hens

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Hot Chick, Aug 23, 2014.

  1. Hot Chick

    Hot Chick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Should I make a coop with separate pens and runs for roosters and hens , pros and cons? And also pictures for examples
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2014
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Having multiple pens/coops, regardless of their purpose has many benefits. I house roosters separately in the dead of winter to protect their combs/wattles with a bit of heat. If you have more than one breed, it's imperative for breeding true. I also like to pedigree eggs and chicks so multiple pens help there too. Multiple pens makes feeding/watering and closing up more labor intensive. Automatic feed and water alleviates that.
     
  3. semcat66

    semcat66 Out Of The Brooder

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    We did not start out with a separate run but after our rooster decided to start bullying the hens with his over-zealous attentions, we fenced off a corner of the existing run and put a separate little shelter in there for him. If he hasn't learned some manners by the time the weather turns cold, we'll be making a meal out of him because I won't be able to keep him in the fully enclosed coop with the hens.

    [​IMG]
    You can see the hens in the main run, they have access to the coop from there. We put up another door to close off Frodo's little section so he can't scare them when they want to go in, since the coop entrance is right by his little pen.

    [​IMG]

    Here you can see the door we put up to keep him in his section. We also put a piece of wood next to the door, so the hens don't see him (or vice versa) as they go into the coop - you can see the coop entrance at the bottom of the pic.

    [​IMG]

    He's not super happy about being separated, but we let him out to free range and keep the hens in the run every 3rd or 4th day. They free range the rest of the time and we let him out into the main run.

    [​IMG]

    You can see the smaller shelter in the last pic, off the right of the coop.

    If we had done our homework and known this was going to be an issue, we probably would have designed the run a bit differently when we first built it, but I think we managed to modify it easily enough to solve the problem. The only issue now is that his little shelter isn't going to keep him warm in the winter - we think they all need to be together in winter for their combined body heat anyway. If you have mild winters where you are, that might not be an issue.

    We also realize that when (if) we want to add new hens to the flock, this will serve very nicely as the "introduction" pen.

    Good luck!
    Susan
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2014
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Ditto^^^^!!!

    I built a partition into my coop, with a separate run and very glad I did. For segregating a rambunctious roo (like when needed right now) and especially for raising my replacement flock for 6 months before integrating with the main flock, priceless!!...and now I wish I had more separate coop/runs for the reasons CC stated.

    Yes, the chores increase, but if you build smart you can minimize that aspect and being able to separate a problem bird(s) is worth any extra chores.
     
  5. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Multiple housing options are also necessary for quarantining, new, injured and sick birds.
     
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    What are your reasons for having multiple roosters? Pets, to eat, breeding program, to sell, or something else? How many do you plan on, hens and roosters? Any age restrictions? Will you be integrating new chickens, either hatched yourself, chicks from a hatchery, or older ones form a swap or other people? How much room do you have and do you plan much free ranging? There are a lot of possible pros to multiple coops and runs and not many cons other than having to feed and water more places and the initial cost to set them up, but it would help if I knew a little bit about your plans and reasons to give you info relevant to your situation. That way I might say something that applies to you and your situation.

    I’m a great believer in having lots of flexibility in dealing with things. Multiple coops and runs or just partitioning your main coop where you can isolate some chickens in there gives you a lot of flexibility, not just for separating roosters and hens.

    I have a 3’ x 6’ brooder built into the main coop. The chicks go there straight from the incubator, but it is also a good broody buster or a place to isolate an injured bird. My grow-out coop is at the opposite end of my run with the ability to section a part of the run off just for the grow-out coop. I keep my chicks in there from about 5 weeks when they normally leave the brooder until I integrate them at 8 weeks, though they continue to sleep in there until they are about 12 weeks and I move them into my main coop. I’ve also kept cockerels in there as they go through puberty. I’ve got another coop inside my electric netting where I usually use for a broody hen and her chicks to sleep at night when my main coop is pretty full, like now. It’s all set up with interconnecting gates and pop holes so I can isolate certain sections or open it up so they can use it all.
     
  7. Lizzydrippin

    Lizzydrippin Just Hatched

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    Hello everyone, I was wondering about a little advice on this subject please.
    I have some young hens (approx 7 months old) and a younger rooster (about 6 months old). He's lovely, having only been with the hens for about a month, he does his job of guarding and protecting them very well.
    I noticed now that he's started to mount some of the hens which is no problem, he seems to know what he's doing without causing the hens too much trouble.
    However, I'm wondering if he's causing a stir in the coop at night or first thing in the morning? I found a spot of fresh blood in the sawdust this morning as I was cleaning out. It wasn't 'poopy' blood but 'fresh' blood if that makes sense. I can see no physical damage on any of my hens but wondering if my rooster is being a bit rough as he is only young and still learning. Should I be separating him at night?
    Thanks.
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Hard to say....I see some blood drips/smears once in a while in the coop, often can't find the source...no telling if it's the rooster causing it or another hen or a comb/wattle snagged on something. Just keep an eye for any wounds.
     
  9. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    It would really help to know where the blood came from. Have you examined the birds looking for wounds or bloody areas? It sounds like this is the first time you saw any blood. Correct? And that it was blood, not bloody poop?

    In the absence of any wounds or other sides, my guess is that they caught a mouse or something similar and pecked it to get it into pieces the size they can eat.

    If it was bloody poop that changes things. Bloody poop still may be no big deal, but it also may be a sign of Coccidiosis. In your climate Coccidiosis is highly unlikely this time of year unless you are heating their coop. If they are acting normal and not standing around fluffed up and lethargic, it is also not likely to be Coccidiosis. I’ll mention it because Coccidiosis is serious but it sure does not sound like Coccidiosis is your problem. Bloody poop could be caused by them shedding some intestinal lining or even eating treats that can color the poop, like beets.

    As long as there are no visible wounds or bloody areas, it is a one-time occurrence, and they are acting normal I would not worry in the least. Obviously watch out for more blood in the future to see if there is a pattern though.
     

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