Sick pullet; swollen and red face

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by katanne555, Dec 29, 2013.

  1. katanne555

    katanne555 Out Of The Brooder

    54
    1
    41
    Oct 29, 2013
    Maine
    Hello, I have 4 ten week old pullets. 3 are white rocks and 1 is a white leghorn. One of the rocks seems to be sick, the skin around her eyes is swollen and the rest of her face is red. Also her eyes are very watery and her beak is always slightly open. None of the other pullets are expiriencing any of these symptons. Also they are all insde still while we try to get a new house built for them. I don't know what's wrong with her, or if she's just growing differently. Ill post pictures later. Does anyone have any idea what could be wrong and how to help her? Any help will be much appreciated. Thank you :)
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

    30,746
    5,107
    561
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    She may be getting a respiratory disease. Can you isolate her? Watch her for more symptoms, and if you can get some oxytetracycline or Tylan for the water, the antibiotic may help. Do you have other chickens where it could have been exposed to something through passing something on your hands?
     
  3. katanne555

    katanne555 Out Of The Brooder

    54
    1
    41
    Oct 29, 2013
    Maine
    I have another fully grown chicken that might have given her an illness, but as far as I know the other chicken has no illnesses. I have the pullet isolated from the others at the moment and am working on getting the antibiotic.
    [​IMG]
    Here is what my pullet looks like.
     
  4. katanne555

    katanne555 Out Of The Brooder

    54
    1
    41
    Oct 29, 2013
    Maine
    I also have now noticed that another pullet has a bloody nose. Could this be related to the illness?
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

    30,746
    5,107
    561
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Bloody mucus from the nose or mouth is sometimes from a virus called ILT or infectious layngotracheitis. Does your older chicken have these symptoms or have they been outdoors to be exposed to wild birds? Could the blood be from pecking? Viruses such as ILT don't respond to antibiotics, unless there is a secondary bacterial infection. Here is a bit about it: http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/83/infectious-laryngotracheitis-ilt
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

    30,746
    5,107
    561
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    I might get antibiotic onhand, and watch for more severe symptoms. Dosage for Tylan Powder is 1 tsp per gallon of water or 1/4 tsp per quart. Tylan Soluble Powder is quite expensive--around $50, but you can also use Tylan 50 injectable (around $12) for shots. !/4 ml or cc into the back of the neck just under the skin for 3-5 days, since they are probably too young for shots into the breast. Some give Tylan50 by mouth in the same dose for 5 days.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2013
  7. katanne555

    katanne555 Out Of The Brooder

    54
    1
    41
    Oct 29, 2013
    Maine
    I couldnt find any Tylan at the stores (besides the injectable kind, but only for pigs and cattle) but what I did find was sulfadimethoxine soluble powder. It says on the package that it can be given to chickens, but doesn't say anything about helping respiratory illnesses. I bought it but haven't given it to any of my pullets or my chicken yet. Could this help with their illness? I am not familiar with many antibiotics.
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

    30,746
    5,107
    561
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    All of the Tylan products are for cattle. It is used off-label in chickens. Sulfdimethoxine is a sulfa drug that is good for treating coccidosis, fowl cholera, and infectious coryza. Coryza is characterized by foul smelling thick nasal mucus and swollen pus-filled eyes. Are your chickens still having bloody noses? You might want to read this link, and look at infectious bronchitis, mycoplasma G, coryza, and Infectious Laryngotracheitis: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

    Most feed stores will carry Duramycin 10, Gallimycin, and
    tetroxy HCA 280 (oxytetracycline.) All of those treat MG/CRD, but ILT is a virus, and antibiotics would only treat a secondary infection.
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2013

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by