Snotty chickens

Princess Poppycock

In the Brooder
9 Years
Sep 12, 2010
51
0
29
I recently got 2 naked necks, 2 astrolorps and a red star. The astrolorps are babies, so theyre in with me. The NN is fine, we're doing a SLOW intergration. The baby nn and the red star have what my kids call the "sneezy snots". They sneeze and make a sound like a human breathing in goop. Baby nn has good poop, the rs has looser poop and *may* have some blood in it, it was hard to tell. Both are active and sem to be eating well, and both have duramycin-10 in their water (although we figured out we were doing it wrong last night in not making it fresh every day. Fixing that problem as we speak). Do we just need to continue with the duramycin (dosing it correctly this time), or is there something else we can do for them?

Also, hat are the chnces of this being fatal to them?

Thanks guys!
Poppy
 

BrianT

Songster
9 Years
May 15, 2010
255
0
109
North FL
I read once that sometimes chickens will get sinus infections that you can treat with amoxycilin(sp?). Bump for the Princess.
 

Princess Poppycock

In the Brooder
9 Years
Sep 12, 2010
51
0
29
Help please??
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PunkinPeep

Songster
10 Years
Mar 31, 2009
3,642
70
229
SouthEast Texas
Are these new birds that you are introducing to an established flock?

Please understand that respiratory illness in chickens is almost always contagious and will cause the affected bird to be a contagious carrier for life, even if you quell the symptoms with antibiotics.

By snotty, do you mean that they are actually having nasal discharge? If they are, i would absolutely cull these birds - and if you choose not to do that, please manage a closed flock - meaning no new birds and no birds leave from your flock to join someone else's. Exposing more chickens to respiratory illness is unkind and should not be done.

We can't tell you whether this will be fatal without diagnosing which illness it actually is, which may only be possible with testing by a state vet or someone like that.
 

Princess Poppycock

In the Brooder
9 Years
Sep 12, 2010
51
0
29
It's not thick, more like a wet sneeze. And they seem healthy otherwise. They are not with my normal flock right now. I will call the guy I got them from and see if he will take them back.
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Last edited:

speckledhen

Intentional Solitude
Premium Feather Member
15 Years
Feb 3, 2007
79,599
15,030
1,326
Blue Ridge Mtns. of North Georgia
If you really think they are ill, culling is the best thing to do. If you take them back, he'll probably try to treat them till their symptoms have subsided and sell them to some other unsuspecting person.
 

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