So... I want to eat my geese--is there a sticky or link for processing

Discussion in 'Geese' started by Germaine_11.20, May 20, 2010.

  1. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    Hi,

    I am trying to find a sticky or link on the best way to process geese. I have looked online and found some info but I think the experts here would be even more helpful.

    Or do I need to go to the meat bird section?
     
  2. HeatherLynn

    HeatherLynn Songster

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    May 11, 2009
    Kentucky, Cecilia
    Try under meat birds and look for a description of how they process game birds. Its very quick, we actually do our chickens that way. Its pretty much peal the skin with feather off and you have a clean bird. I don't know further details because I make my husband do it all without my knowledge but I know he got the instructions from this site.
     
  3. OCD

    OCD In the Brooder

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    Bay Area
    I just laughed out loud, and interupted my husbands war show to laugh at the name of your post! Sooooo....I want to eat my geese.... I know what you mean! I had a mean Toulouse break my finger about 10 years ago. I'm still laughing!!!![​IMG]
     
  4. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    Thanks Heather and OCD always glad to help someone have a good laugh. I am tired of having to watch my back everytime I step out the door-- not to mention having to watch where I step period. Poop everywhere!!!!!!

    They were cute little goslings, hand fed. Now they are nasty, attack geese and I walk around with a mop, stick, rake or whatever I can get my hands on-- or else they assume the "I am coming to get you" position and then I have to assume the "I will get you first" position Good thing I live in the country and this isn't easily witnessed.

    Every time they do this I promise myself I will figure out how to process them soon. So I am keeping my promise to myself and soon will be having goose pate' and sleeping on a nice soft down pillow.....
     
  5. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Process them just like chickens. The only difference is in the scalding and plucking. Scald at a lower temperature and longer. With waterfowl it pays to have some paraffin on hand to aid in feather removal. These days I just skin the birds altogether and skip scalding and plucking entirely. The skin is too fatty and I like my geese stir-fried anyhow.

    Nothing tastes better than an animal that has been irritating you for months. Good luck.
     
  6. duck walk

    duck walk Songster

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    Jun 13, 2009
    white springs, fl
    I can relate...I have a gander who has decided over the last two days that he is in charge of something...he beat the snot out of one of my Runner ducks, pulled all the feathers out of her back, tore skin, left her in the kiddie pool water logged to die...he is in goose prison and headed for freezer camp...I hate bullies of any species...I wont sell him with that 'tude going on and I wont put up with him either...he will graduate to attacking people and I am the only people around...I take very good care of them all and I have also told them all that I love roasted goose and duck so ya better behave or else...evidently this guy is not a believer...freezer camp...
     
  7. Thamnophis

    Thamnophis In the Brooder

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    Oct 29, 2009
    My toulouse started biting last winter. It didn't bother me much but they bruised my 6 year old's butt a couple times. That made me angry enough to boot the geese - I used the side of my boot rather than the point, and hit them along their side rather than head on, but I hit them hard enough to knock them back 3 feet. It only took 2 times before they learned to stay back a couple feet.

    As far as the poop problem, we're using a lightweight fencing to create rotational grazing areas on our lawn. The geese are kept off driveways, sidewalks, etc with the fencing and quickly graze the lawn area down. After a couple days the fence gets moved to the next area. They do have to be herded back to the barn every night, but they know the drill so move along quickly. The hope is this will be a time saver over mowing - we'll see.
     
  8. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    Wow, I appreciate the help from all of you. I will skin them then. I have never eaten Goose. I had duck the other day just to see if I liked it and oh yeah, I liked it.

    So far though my Muscovy drake is my buddy so he stays for now. But the 11 babies won't all be able to say the same thing.

    Oh, one more question if anyone knows. It said on the internet that I needed to "stun" the goose before bleeding them out. Is this because they are so big that they will not stay put in the killing cone or is it really a need to do process?

    Can I just use a 22 rifle? Quick...
     
  9. goosedragon

    goosedragon Songster

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    Quote:Go To The meat Bird section and if they don't have methods for geese follow the Duck methods. Waterfowl are often skinned due to the problem of scalding a water resistent set of feathers and waterfowl are more likely to have pin feathers. You should be warned that they will not roast nicely without skin and how else would you cook a goose. Down recovery is another process best covered by the "Book of Geese" which can be read Online here: http://www.fastonline.org/CD3WD_40/JF/414/05-234.pdf
    all 222 pages worth. It is a tough job and you will learn why goose down is so expensive. Good Luck!
     
  10. Germaine_11.20

    Germaine_11.20 Songster

    Jun 6, 2009
    Idaho
    Quote:Go To The meat Bird section and if they don't have methods for geese follow the Duck methods. Waterfowl are often skinned due to the problem of scalding a water resistent set of feathers and waterfowl are more likely to have pin feathers. You should be warned that they will not roast nicely without skin and how else would you cook a goose. Down recovery is another process best covered by the "Book of Geese" which can be read Online here: http://www.fastonline.org/CD3WD_40/JF/414/05-234.pdf
    all 222 pages worth. It is a tough job and you will learn why goose down is so expensive. Good Luck!

    Thank you, I was looking for something just like that!
     

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