So tired of predators...

old biddy

Songster
Sep 30, 2010
380
305
231
Lamont, Florida
Don't donkey around, get the two acres fenced and get one GP. Find one that has been raised with birds and about six months old if possible.
Yes, that's how I feel. I just didn't want to dismiss my daughter's idea so I thought I would throw it out there. From what I have read the donkeys are good for pastures with sheep or cattle but little help for chicken coops with predator racoons and other small critters.

I am seriously considering the fencing and the Great Pyrenees. Checking out the cost factor and the time needed to save enough and get it all set up. In the meantime, I am putting up an electric fence around my chicken yard and peacock pen.
 

LaFleche

Free Ranging
Sep 22, 2012
3,109
10,819
512
Germany
So, my next question is: do you use bird netting or hardware cloth on the top of your pens? Thank you for your insight.
Netting will not be enough without electric fencing.

Installing hot wire will deter any of the before mentioned predators and bring back some peace of mind.

We had raccoons coming and wreacking havoc in the mornings, afternoons, evenings and at night. Same with foxes, raccoon dog, feral cats, stray dogs etc.

Since we set up the electric fence there have not been any other incidents but for goshawk attacks every once in a while which were mostly deterred by strong netting (fishing gear).
 

mbrobbins

Crowing
Mar 12, 2008
493
111
251
Powder Springs, ga
I panicked last week when i found my little (setting)serama hen gone, and found where she had been eaten probably by a racoon. I realized that i hadn't hooked all my locks on the pen door, the bottom hook was not latched, and the predator pulled the door open at the bottom just enough to squeeze in. She had been setting on 9 eggs, so i gathered the already cold eggs up and put them in the incubator. Today I have 8 tiny serama chicks, something to carry on the bloodline of my sweet little hen lost forever. the bottom pic is the Dad.
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Flockincrazy

Songster
May 23, 2020
2,136
4,341
243
Elyria, Ohio
I panicked last week when i found my little (setting)serama hen gone, and found where she had been eaten probably by a racoon. I realized that i hadn't hooked all my locks on the pen door, the bottom hook was not latched, and the predator pulled the door open at the bottom just enough to squeeze in. She had been setting on 9 eggs, so i gathered the already cold eggs up and put them in the incubator. Today I have 8 tiny serama chicks, something to carry on the bloodline of my sweet little hen lost forever. the bottom pic is the Dad. View attachment 2370475
I wish it would let you give 2 emojis 😪sad face for momma :celebrateand total excitement for the babies
 

old biddy

Songster
Sep 30, 2010
380
305
231
Lamont, Florida
I panicked last week when i found my little (setting)serama hen gone, and found where she had been eaten probably by a racoon. I realized that i hadn't hooked all my locks on the pen door, the bottom hook was not latched, and the predator pulled the door open at the bottom just enough to squeeze in. She had been setting on 9 eggs, so i gathered the already cold eggs up and put them in the incubator. Today I have 8 tiny serama chicks, something to carry on the bloodline of my sweet little hen lost forever. the bottom pic is the Dad. View attachment 2370475
Oh...so sorry to hear it. Darn coons. Was it during the day or night? I have seen the raccoons on my camera at night but the attack on my rooster was during the late afternoon. Broke my heart. But I am so glad your chicks hatched out okay. They are adorable and look just like their handsome daddy!
 

mbrobbins

Crowing
Mar 12, 2008
493
111
251
Powder Springs, ga
Oh...so sorry to hear it. Darn coons. Was it during the day or night? I have seen the raccoons on my camera at night but the attack on my rooster was during the late afternoon. Broke my heart. But I am so glad your chicks hatched out okay. They are adorable and look just like their handsome daddy!
thanks for your kind words, The Mama was black and white too, just couldn't find a pic of her, but it happened at night, and i didn't even check on mama hen's nest til that evening, so the eggs were not incubated for at least 10 hours, and i really didn't have any hope for the eggs since they were cold for so long, but after i left them in the incubator for a couple of days , I candled them, and thought i saw some movement, so I know she would have been a proud Mama to have at least 8 chicks to carry on her legacy. I think I'm going to build me a new sturdier door that doesn't take 3 latches. I call it a miracle hatch. I had no idea the embryos would stay alive that long without incubation. they hatched 6 days later.
 

ColtHandorf

Crowing
Feb 19, 2019
2,661
3,684
357
Klondike, Texas
I guess my question is: do you think it will make a difference in predator problems if I clear out several acres of the small bushes and underbrush near my pens?
Something should be said about making areas less wild. I live on four acres and keep my lawn mowed very short every two weeks. Each weekend I spend several hours outside cleaning up the fence line around the property. By trimming all the underbrush back and removing piles of debris left by the previous tenants (both actual trash and organic such as brush piles and fallen limbs) I have greatly reduced the amount of predators. I also keep the back pasture mowed twice yearly. Before I did that, I'd seen coyote, fox, and bobcats, in addition to rats/mice, snakes, opossums, raccoons, hawks, and owls. Cleaning that up has certainly helped me manage the wildlife to an extent. I'd be happier if the neighbors took care of their property, but at least the birds can free range for a few hours in the evening when I'm home from work and I don't have to worry about them getting snatched by something at the frequency one might expect. Most animals that are used to "wild" settings are unwilling to be in open areas without cover. Keeping things cleaned up and grass short helps to visually create a line that most cautious, non-socialized wild animals will not cross.
 

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