Something ate my chickens leg. Should I cull it?

Shezadandy

Crowing
Sep 26, 2015
1,663
1,894
307
Portland OR
I had a chick get its leg caught in a tiny space between hinges, broke the leg in more than once place higher up in the struggle, and had stripped the skin 3/4 of the way around the leg trying to yank free. He kept eating and talking so I gave him a chance- we went through a long healing and recovery process. Once the skin healed enough where I could pin up the leg to his body, that little guy was off like a shot. Before I wrapped that leg up by his body, he would move around a little - but as soon as it was up out of his way - couldn't keep him still. He's full grown now, almost a bantam sized bird- which helps. One of those legs has a big bow in it- so is nowhere near normal - but - he gets where he wants to go, lives with the flock, including 4 other full grown roosters- gets on the roost at night - and has even been spotted mating hens. He's got the added advantage that the 2nd leg is there for balance - but he doesn't do much else with it.
 

BigBlueHen53

Fragile, Beautiful, Strong
Premium member
Mar 5, 2019
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SE Missouri, USA
I had a chick get its leg caught in a tiny space between hinges, broke the leg in more than once place higher up in the struggle, and had stripped the skin 3/4 of the way around the leg trying to yank free. He kept eating and talking so I gave him a chance- we went through a long healing and recovery process. Once the skin healed enough where I could pin up the leg to his body, that little guy was off like a shot. Before I wrapped that leg up by his body, he would move around a little - but as soon as it was up out of his way - couldn't keep him still. He's full grown now, almost a bantam sized bird- which helps. One of those legs has a big bow in it- so is nowhere near normal - but - he gets where he wants to go, lives with the flock, including 4 other full grown roosters- gets on the roost at night - and has even been spotted mating hens. He's got the added advantage that the 2nd leg is there for balance - but he doesn't do much else with it.
:eek: Wow! And :love that's awesome. I'll remember this next time somebody asks, and will try not to be so quick to judge. Thanks for sharing this.
 

chicknmania

Crowing
12 Years
13 Years
Jan 26, 2007
5,596
815
382
central Ohio
If the bird smells like death that's not a great sign ...it could mean gangrene..but again, hard to say without seeing..and if she/ he continues to act ok and is eating, I probably would be tempted to try to save it, especially since now you have the antibiotic injections! I have a friend who adopted a bantam rooster who had lost his leg at the previous owner's place when a door slammed on it. My friend wanted to have a prosthetic leg made for him but she found there was no need. He got around (free ranging) just fine with the rest of her small flock.
 

Shezadandy

Crowing
Sep 26, 2015
1,663
1,894
307
Portland OR
Vetricyn can work wonders as well. @Kattnchick came up with this awesome setup to help a chick strenghten the good leg for the baby in the picture. A scaled up version could help keep OP's injured bird up out of the litter, giving it a better chance to fight the infection, and help her with some physical therapy by allowing supported movement... All we can ever do is try- knowing we may not suceed, and being ready to do the hard thing if our efforts aren't improving life for the sick or injured critter.

 

Shezadandy

Crowing
Sep 26, 2015
1,663
1,894
307
Portland OR
They aren’t domestic like city stray. These are feral farm area cats. The landlord lady puts feed and water out in her barn which lures a lot of them to her property but you can’t get near them and I’ve seen the way they tear each other up fighting. Other possibilities would be coon, possum, or fox, but I think it happened during the daytime and those are nocturnal.
I have to add - the outdoor cat who came with our property would regularly bring us squirrels and full sized rabbits bigger than he was. He'd would always eat the front end first, then come back for the hind end the next day. He never had a chance at our chickens- because he was a skilled hunter and a near surgical butcher! Now- he never left anything alive maimed like has happened with your pullet. He was at most 7lbs.

The pictures are graphic so I've left them small for those who don't wish to see them.
 

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ConnieA

Songster
Mar 9, 2015
293
687
201
They aren’t domestic like city stray. These are feral farm area cats. The landlord lady puts feed and water out in her barn which lures a lot of them to her property but you can’t get near them and I’ve seen the way they tear each other up fighting. Other possibilities would be coon, possum, or fox, but I think it happened during the daytime and those are nocturnal.
FYI, foxes are daytime predators around here. I am in eastern central Missouri. So are coyotes. Both are also nocturnal predators, too. It depends on how hungry they are.
 

Cedar Creek Farm Lady

🐣Hatch~aholic🐣
Premium member
Oct 12, 2019
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LeFlore County, Oklahoma
One of my chickens was hopping when I went out. His leg is gone. Theres a gaping hole i can see his inside body cavity and he smells like death and decay but he’s acting like he’s fine other then hopping and the missing parts. I tried to get a picture but it doesn’t look so bad in the picture. View attachment 1950274
Any update on how your one legged chicken is doing?
 

Chris-n-Kate

Songster
Mar 13, 2019
124
300
162
She’s healing up really well. The exposed bone makes me nervous, but she stopped smelling bad when I gave her antibiotics. She eats and drinks and I bring her out to practice hopping and standing several times a day. I’m going to keep her in the house until spring because we are already having subarctic temps and she is getting accustomed to the house temperature.
 
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