Sour crop- is it to late to save her?

#lovemychickens

Songster
Jul 24, 2017
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This is the hardest part of keeping and loving chickens. When I have this situation and I know in my heart that there is no chance of my patient making it, I give myself and my patient a deadline, say tomorrow morning. If she is the same or worse, there is no more thinking involved. I just do it.
Damn this is hard! I think I’m going to say by tomorrow evening if she is the same then it just has to be done. I will give the medstatin a chance to work tonight and all day tomorrow.. and go from there. Thank you for helping me!
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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You are not alone. I'm here.

The most painful part is between now and when you make the final decision. After that, it isn't as agonizing, and it then begins to hurt less as you mark time from that point.

Just remember, her essential essence cannot be destroyed, only the material that makes up what contains her true essence. Same goes for all life. The package we occupy is temporary, but our essence is immortal. This is what connects all living things.
 

micstrachan

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Apr 10, 2016
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I'm so sorry about your hen. You are in good hands with azygous. I do wonder if your hen is getting dehydrated, which can make her weak. Do you have access to a vet (avian or otherwise) who might be able to administer subcutaneous fluids? It's just a thought.

I'm so sorry things are looking bad for your girl. Last summer I had a hen who had gotten severely anemic and seemed to have blood in her stool (stools were black). They did an x-ray to check for hardware disease, and it was negative for metal. She had gassy bloated intestines, and the avian vet did not know why. They prescribed an antibiotic and barium sulfate to coat (and hopefully sooth) her intestines. Amazingly, she eventually recovered! I had tried a different feed around that time and wonder if she had some sort of sensitivity to it.

I know this is a long shot, but I wonder if there is something you could administer that might coat and sooth her gastrointestinal tract? The trouble is, with a full crop that easily vomits, administering any liquid into the crop seems risky. I wonder if a pepto bismol type tablet might help give her intestines a chance to recover?

Also, the deep red comb sounds possibly like her infection could be going septic. Would you be wiling to check her temperature?

I know I am late to the thread and throwing wild ideas out there. Please know that if you feel it is time to let her go, I support you in that, as well.

Big hug.
 

#lovemychickens

Songster
Jul 24, 2017
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I just went to check on her and she passed away sometime between 11:30 p.m. and 2:20 a.m. Mixed emotions happening here- It’s a vary sad day but I am almost relieved too because Miss Gracie is no longer suffering. I didn’t have to be the one to end her life and I’m thankful for that. I just hope I didn’t kill her with all of the medication I’ve been giving and I hope I didn’t harm her with the Medstatin. 😭 Thank you everyone for your support and guidance with Miss Gracie. I would have been lost without you!
 

azygous

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11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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Gracie. Sweet Gracie. No you didn't hurt her with the meds. There just wasn't anything that was going to work for what really caused this.

As @micstrachan pointed out, her cherry red comb and wattles indicated a spike in body temp and that the infection was running wild at that point, and it was then I knew we had probably lost her. This was just bigger than all of us to fight.

I am guessing this was a cancer with a secondary bacterial infection. There isn't much to be done for those foes, even when it hits humans.
 

#lovemychickens

Songster
Jul 24, 2017
148
188
141
Gracie. Sweet Gracie. No you didn't hurt her with the meds. There just wasn't anything that was going to work for what really caused this.

As @micstrachan pointed out, her cherry red comb and wattles indicated a spike in body temp and that the infection was running wild at that point, and it was then I knew we had probably lost her. This was just bigger than all of us to fight.

I am guessing this was a cancer with a secondary bacterial infection. There isn't much to be done for those foes, even when it hits humans.
Some think I’m crazy to have put that much effort into a chicken but you know what, I’d do it again. They are loveable, sweet and funny little balls of feathers that bring joy to my life. I truly appreciate all of you!
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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Colorado Rockies
As long as a chicken is fighting to live, I will put everything I have into the battle. Like my marathon with my Blue Australorp May. She isn't this first one I've devoted months of care and treatment to. May has never given up the fight and so I haven't, either.

I had an adopted Buff Orpinton Edith that had a significant wound on her tail nub. I spent weeks trying to get it to heal. It never did. It eventually got to where she was in significant pain and I euthanized her. I believe now the wound was actually a squamous cancer that chickens can get.
 

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