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Starting Out with Pheasantsl.

Discussion in 'Pheasants and Partridge (Chukar)' started by jykmoy, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. jykmoy

    jykmoy Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 6, 2012
    We have a wild, male cock pheasant around our neighborhood. He croaks all the time looking for a female, but there are none around. There use to be one; a pair. And they walk around the neighborhood as if they owned the place! Alas. We're not sure what happened to the female. All this has prompted my buddy and I to think of hatching and raising some pheasants for release. All kinds of concerns immediately pop up. We're not thinking big...we just want to hatch a few pheasants, raise them, and then release them. We live on an island that is VERY RURAL.
    Suggestions from everyone will be appreciated.

    I mentioned this interest to a friend who told me she use to hatch pheasant eggs in a bowl with a heat lamp. Her husband farms and his machinery had killed a mother hen who was laying on her eggs, so he brought the eggs home and she hatched them! Sounds simple to me!
     
  2. birdboy15

    birdboy15 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 13, 2010
    Falmouth, Michigan
    The pheasants that you release would just be easy prey for predators. I have also seen eggs hatched this way but it is a very unstable method that does not work well, especially with pheasants as they are harder to hatch than chickens.
     
  3. centurion90

    centurion90 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 16, 2011
    Loxahatchee
    Well, i don't know which species of pheasant nor where you live. There may be laws in your area that don't allow this, so you may need to look into that. Also, if you wanted to have any pheasant survive, you would have to release a very large number as most will be wiped out by predation and weather. All this will most likey cost a pretty penny, lots of effort in your part, and time.
     

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