straw or hay bale gardening

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by TLWR, Jan 16, 2016.

  1. Tumbling K

    Tumbling K Overrun With Chickens

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    I have no shortage of slick fence wire at the house, so I can always wire it up.

    I also always have hardware cloth, and chicken wire, so could do that too, to help hold in place.

    yep, my head is swimming with the possibilities.

    and not have to fight the bermuda, nearly as much.....
     
  2. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    That would be one advantage, for sure!
     
  3. hillbillyreefer

    hillbillyreefer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I forgot to mention, my garden is frozen solid about 6months of the year, greatly slowing decomposition.:rolleyes:
     
  4. Tumbling K

    Tumbling K Overrun With Chickens

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    yeah, that would be important. lol

    I'll be decomposing pretty much all year long. but I might could get my spring/summer garden, and a fall/winter garden out of one set of bales.....
     
  5. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    You might want to see a doctor about that! You could easily get spring/summer, fall/winter out of one set of bales. I find that by the next season, they're formless. Would still work, but not as attractive as a formed bale. As I move on in years, I'm getting more formless also.
     
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  6. Tumbling K

    Tumbling K Overrun With Chickens

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    thanks for the head's up.

    maybe If I imbibe more bourbon, it will have a pickling effect?

    I'm just wondering if you could make a hardware cloth cylinder, line the inside with weed fabric and form a raised bed?

    or heck, maybe a few wooden posts n the ground, put some corrugated roofing up, and just keep putting fresh hay bales on top of the decomposed ones, and eventually have a raised bed that way?
     
  7. potato chip

    potato chip lunch-sharer

    When my garden was more of a garden and not a wasteland of chicken holes, I also used straw (wheat) as mulch. The wheat would germinate and I'd have wheat growing everywhere. All of my "critters" like eating it, it is not only a great green manure crop but "dinner" for bunnies and birds. It sprouts in spring and dies off in summer. If you really wanted to be rid of it, it's not hard to pull up (unlike the couch grass underneath it which was killed by the mulch, eventually)
     
  8. hillbillyreefer

    hillbillyreefer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've got a huge pot I've done exactly that in. Filled it with hay, put some compost on top and planted tomatoes in it. Most years it's the largest tomatoe plant on the place. I like the idea of doing it on a larger scale. Less weeding for the kids should make that idea an easy sell, lol.
     
  9. Tumbling K

    Tumbling K Overrun With Chickens

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    so I have found two different sources for my square bales. one is $5 per bale, the other is $3 per bale.

    $3 per bale got rained on, and probably has some mold.

    while I don't see that as an issue, I will probably go with the $5, know the guy I will be getting them from.

    I'm pretty excited about this hay bale gardening.

    I awlays start getting excited when it's almost time to start setting seeds, but his year, have some extra get up!!
     
  10. shortgrass

    shortgrass Overrun With Chickens

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    We use corn stalk bales too... We use most if our hay for feeding the cattle, but sometimes we save a couple dumpy looking round bales for the yard; the nitrogen in it is great!

    We use mostly straw, just because it's what we grow for bedding lol ;) that and corn stalk bales, which take a lot longer to break down but give me plenty of humus to work with after a year.

    I actually like the straw the best as far as gardening with; I don't mind the wheat sprouts and it is easier to turn come spring vs the corn stalks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2016

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