Sumatra experts I have a question

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by perchie.girl, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

    I am intrigued by Sumatras and would like to raise some.

    I am interested in finding out their temperment. I dont care about aloofness just about how well they get along with each other and other chickens. I am prepared to keep them in their own coop and run but would like to know if I could co-mingle them with the rest of the chickens occasionally. I know they are good fliers and read some of the histories online about some being able to fly from island to island. I have eighteen acres so if one flys about there are no worries, only to get him to come back.

    Most places sell only straight run... Do you think the extra males would get along in a Bachelor flock? Or would I need to separate them at all.

    I do want good bloodlines that follow the standard. Any links to breeders would be helpful as well. So far I have only found a couple of hatcherys that carry them but I would rather buy from a breeder.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Mystic Farms

    Mystic Farms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 5, 2011
    Sumatras are as you say aloof. I had 5 boys and twelve girls running around 5 acres( downsized to 2 roos and 6 hens now) and they rarely left sight of the barn and were always in bed on the rafters by dusk. As long as they know where dinner is lol!!

    The older roos tend to keep the "young bucks" from getting to full of themselves and will actually break up a fight. I have had mine in the yard with cochins standard and bantams, ducks, goats, seramas, rir and polish all free ranging together (roos of all but rir too!) with no problems. No they were not all raised together. Mine have done well in shows taking bob and rb each time - yes there were other breeders there and yes they were apa shows. Too bad you are not closer as we are seriously thinking about selling our flock as we don't have the acreage any more and they really dislike cages!

    They are great scavengers and very low maintenance, but beautiful to watch. They won't jump on your lap like a cochin or d'uccles but they are not mean or aggressive either.

    The main problems you will find with hatchery stuff is red faces/combs and upright tails both dqs, mainstream problems include lack of multiple spurs (according to the last judge they are being shown more and more but that is a dq too!) I have declined free birds because of those traits - they are better left to the pet world! Hope that helps.
     
  3. perchie.girl

    perchie.girl Desert Dweller Premium Member

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    This is absolutely great, news. I had read that they were cocky, but I hoped it was just their wild nature. Where are you located. I am not interested in showing just having beautiful well bred individuals I have lots of space for a yard/coop for those times when Id want purebred eggs.

    Ideally for a group your size say 8 or 10 what size breeder coop would you suggest. My coops are all open air with wind protection and sun protection on three sides. We do get cold here but only about 2-4 days of snow... total for the year. All will be under one roof. For instance I have 3) 6 x 12 partitions designated for Welsummers, Amauracanas, and Marans, I have one partition of 6 x 18 designated for Guineas. One 6 x 12 partition that is open for discussion. And two 6 x 6 partitions for small groups. Each partition in the coop can have its own run Each of the runs will be openable to the other so I could run the flocks together for more space.

    Do you think a 6 x 12 space would be enough for 8 - 10 Sumatras? I can make their run very large. Just for those times when I want hatching eggs.

    I am hoping to either find a good breeder for some chicks or to buy some hatching eggs. I absolutely do not want red combs or non multiple spurs. Just the same as I want pure bred Amauracanas and good quality Welsummers and Marans. Eventually I want some Auracanas. Once I get the flock to gether I hope to close it except to the occasional influx of fresh bloolines through hatching eggs.
     

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