Telling genders for most breeds of chicken

redroosta

Flown the Coop
10 Years
May 29, 2009
248
0
109
During chickhood, female chicks will grow their tail feathers and wing feathers at the same time while their comb will grow at a slower pace.

Also during chickhood, males at the same age as females will have little or no tail feathers but will grow wing feathers and comb at the same time.

During adult hood, females will be smaller, have shorter tails, will lay eggs, will have a smaller comb, and will not crow. They will usually be less colorful than the roosters. Unless you have a breed like white leghorns which have only one color. Then this method won't work. Their tails will also curve.
 

rodriguezpoultry

Langshan Lover
11 Years
Jan 4, 2009
10,918
126
361
Claremore, OK
Quote:It depends on the strain of fowl. Some males get their feathering faster than females.

Also during chickhood, males at the same age as females will have little or no tail feathers but will grow wing feathers and comb at the same time.

Again. Depends on the strain. I am STILL waiting on my cockerels to get their wing feathers in. Many still have fuzz whereas my pullets grew all of their weeks ago.

During adult hood, females will be smaller, have shorter tails, will lay eggs, will have a smaller comb, and will not crow. They will usually be less colorful than the roosters. Unless you have a breed like white leghorns which have only one color. Then this method won't work. Their tails will also curve.

Not all females are smaller than males 100% of the time. Some females lay eggs, some seem to never lay eggs. Floppy combs such as those in the Mediterranean class may cause confusion as the female seems to have the same size comb as does a male. In poorly bred lines, the male comb may flop over like the female...causing even more confusion.

Leghorns come in several different colors. White is simply the variety. Tails of the Leghorn females should not curve under any circumstance. Phoenix however seem to have a slight curve at the end of their tails, but again, look nothing like the males main tail and sickle feathers.​
 

redroosta

Flown the Coop
10 Years
May 29, 2009
248
0
109
During adult hood, females will be smaller, have shorter tails, will lay eggs, will have a smaller comb, and will not crow. They will usually be less colorful than the roosters. Unless you have a breed like white leghorns which have only one color. Then this method won't work. Their tails will also curve.

Not all females are smaller than males 100% of the time. Some females lay eggs, some seem to never lay eggs. Floppy combs such as those in the Mediterranean class may cause confusion as the female seems to have the same size comb as does a male. In poorly bred lines, the male comb may flop over like the female...causing even more confusion.

Leghorns come in several different colors. White is simply the variety. Tails of the Leghorn females should not curve under any circumstance. Phoenix however seem to have a slight curve at the end of their tails, but again, look nothing like the males main tail and sickle feathers.

sorry I meant to say that THE MALES tail feathers curve, thanks for pointing that out.​
 

georgialee

Songster
10 Years
Apr 9, 2009
2,399
11
191
Knoxville, TN
I've had a different experience:

cochins: some feathered very fast, some very slow - all ended up being pullets

blrw: all feathered at the same time, the same way... 1 pullet, 2 roos, 1 I'm not sure on

sex-link pullet - feathered incrediably slow. Had almost no tail at all until around 6 weeks of age.

My speckled sussex chicks feathered in a 'normal' pullet fashion with their tail feathering out quickly... but I don't have any roos to compare with.

Silkies: feathed at same rate except for the top knots - roo is feathering slower there.

ee's - feathered at all different times.. no similarities. I had one roo take a long time to feather and another feathered at the same rate as the pullets.
 

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