The Buckeye Thread

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Happy Chooks, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. Blueface

    Blueface Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The old catalogs are really interesting! I can see the Cornish resemblance; it's pretty apparent; but everyone sees things differently?!?! Of course it's not going to exhibit the traits of today's Cornish because they didn't exists back then as they do today.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 18, 2013
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  2. homeworkin

    homeworkin Out Of The Brooder

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    A dual purpose bird should be of practical value on a family farm. A nasty bird is of limited value if it is not safe around children. My Buckeye and BLRW roost are super nice. But I have chosen not to breed the nasty roosters I have encountered (Polish Crested and Welsummer, in these cases).
     
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  3. fowlman01

    fowlman01 Overrun With Chickens

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    I haven't had Hamburgs in 15 years.
    I don't see large Hamburg often, sorry.
     
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  4. buffalogal

    buffalogal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, found two more, apparently from the same source:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    It makes me smile to see that even 100 years ago, people were naming their favorite chickens. [​IMG]
     
  5. Blueface

    Blueface Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That top pic is rather interesting; look at how snake headed or thin/narrow headed that female is?!? That was not a good thing back than and it certainly isn't a good thing today. But one thing I notice in both of those pics is the lack of fluff in the saddle region and each at least some sort of tail angle! I wonder what happened for some of today's birds to have those problems?
     
  6. slfarms

    slfarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quite interesting as the standard would have been based on hens like this. So fluff was a no no back then even and tails had to have the correct angle.
    I would cull any that look like they had a cushion right before the tail and the tail itself points towards the ground. IMO

    Cage training for shows doesn't make the bird hold the tail up properly. [​IMG]
     
  7. buffalogal

    buffalogal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh drat! Again with the long hand.
    "I can see the Cornish resemblance; it's pretty apparent; but everyone sees things differently?!?! Of course it's not going to exhibit the traits of today's Cornish because they didn't exists back then as they do today."
    To be honest, I'm not seeing much of that Transformer Cornish you posted earlier either. I'm not saying the drawing was cartoonish, actually, I think the sketch was very well done, only that the bird itself looks like something you might see on Saturday morning cartoons, suddenly unfolding from a Mack truck into a chicken. [​IMG] At any rate, apart from the head, in particular the comb, I'm not seeing alot of the one evident in the other. When you compare the hens, the resemblance gets really hard to pin down.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 18, 2013
  8. Blueface

    Blueface Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Like I said; not everyone is going to see the direct comparison; but it is actually there based on Mrs. Metcalf's writings. I'm sure it was much more evident in the initial crosses much like the aseel and American game crosses of today. But after a few selected crosses based on Mrs. Metcalf's vision of her breed the other utilized breed traits will make a presence; IMO.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
  9. PA Farmer24

    PA Farmer24 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not to change topic but.... I have had some discussion in another type of social media on this subject and well let's just say it did ruffle some feathers and there are people who think what I'm saying is wrong. Open for discussion [​IMG]

    Ok this question my ruffle some feathers. Oh well...

    Lately I have been seeing a lot of posts around the internet on people still breeding and hatching eggs. I have a real problem with this as this is the time of year that the birds are going thru a lot of changes with molt and getting ready for the harsh winters. Fall moving into winter is the time of year to most and I mean most breeders let their birds rest and have some time to add on poundage from the long breeding season of spring and late summer. Most hens are so exhausted that they need this time of year to recoup. Breeding and rasing chicks in the dead of winter in most parts of the states is not a good idea. It's bad enough trying to deal with the winter and taking care of birds let a lone chicks. Again this is my opinion not everyone may agree with this and frankly I would expect that.


    Granted that there are some places in the USA that are nice or mild all year long, however what I am seeing is places that are in the northern areas of the country. Even still this time of year most true (good) breeders and/or backyard hobbist let their birds rest. Most will start back up for breeding in Late Jan early Feb and run till about End of April to early May. Because once the temps start getting too warm it is hard to ship chicks and/or eggs with out bad results. Then most will start back up again in Sept time frame and run a shorten breeding program and then whine down for the later part of fall into early winter for a rest period for the flock and to also allow the better pullets and cockerels that were choosen to be the next breeding pairs to fill out more before they ramp back up.

    My opinion on places like FL, South TX is that yes the breeders can go longer but ya still have to give the birds a rest or you will end up wearing them out sooner rather than later. I'm talking more on the USA. Yes having birds in breed pens for this sole purpose will exhaust them and if the winter in harsh in a particular area that could cause them to not make it. LIke I said before to each their own and if you do continue to raise birds throught the winter please and I mean please make sure you have the facilities to hold them until such time that you can let them outside and make it. That is my point on hatching late in the year and or thru the winter. I know that there are many who live where the climates are mild and that allows them to have better options than the ones who live in the northern states. Look at how the hatcheries do it, think about it there is a reason why they have limited numbers of certain breeds available this time of year.


    So why would you want to exhaust your birds to the point that they may end up not making the winter or even try and raise chicks during the winter?
     
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  10. slfarms

    slfarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So what is your opinion why the buckeye is tighter feathered in comparison to the other American breeds and what breed could have made that trait so apparent?

    That picture is hardly a "transformer" because it appears properly built and proportional balanced.

    [​IMG]
     

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