The Buff Orpington Duck Thread

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by HallFamilyFarm, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. Exhibition Breeder

    7 vote(s)
    7.4%
  2. Superior Farms, Oklahoma

    1 vote(s)
    1.1%
  3. Metzer Farms

    35 vote(s)
    37.2%
  4. Ideal Poultry Farms

    9 vote(s)
    9.6%
  5. Other Hatchery

    16 vote(s)
    17.0%
  6. BYC member

    4 vote(s)
    4.3%
  7. Other

    26 vote(s)
    27.7%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm PA ETL#195

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    Jan 25, 2010
    Collins, Arkansas
    Please post photos of your Buff Duck flock; the source of your flock; and any interesting information about the Buff Duck. Lets try to stay on topic and not get into too much debates. Am hoping for a great and productive thread that will help beginner and experienced breeders alike.

    Have always wanted some Buff "Orpington" Ducks. Last season we ordered some ducklings from Ideal Poultry Farm. Culled 22 down to 5 hens. Most of the ducklings had lots of white on them and several were crested. Then we added Arnold...aka Arnold Scharzenegger. He was from Superior Farms and won Best of Breed at the Arkansas State Fair. We placed well at the APA National in Shawnee. In October we added another 20 ducklings from Metzer Farms. These were much better quality. We have since researched the sources of all three farms and discovered all three acquired their starter flocks from Rev. Roland Romig in PA. We have sold a young trio on featherauction (Mr and Mrs Turbo's site) and may offer another young pair soon. We have 5 extra young drakes. My kids want duck for dinner one Sunday. I would rather have feed money.

    Yesterday we recieved our first few eggs of the season. Another egg by 8am this morning. These started laying at about 5 months old and layed until mid October. Hoping they lay more this season. Below are photos of our Buff Duck flock.

    http://www.metzerfarms.com http://www.ideal-poultry.com


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    From the http://www.albc-usa.org/cpl/waterfowl/buffduck.html

    Buff
    Duck
    William Cook, the famous poultry breeder from Orpington, Kent, blended Cayuga, Runner, Aylesbury, and Rouen ducks to create a buff colored duck that would allow him to cash in on the early 20th century English fad for buff-colored plumage. This first duck was called a Buff Orpington and Cook went on to develop Blue, Black and Chocolate Orpington versions that had white bibs on their chests. Cook introduced his Buff Orpington to the United States in 1908 at the Madison Square Garden Show in New York City. In 1914, this breed was admitted into the American Standard of Perfection under the name "Buff," which is unusual since in no other instance is a color used as a breed name. (Holderread, 60)

    The Buff is a medium-weight duck of 7 to 8 lbs. It is a long, broad bird with an oval head, medium length bill, and long, gracefully curved neck. The Buff duck's body carriage is twenty degrees above horizontal, its wings are short and it has a small, well-curled tail. Both the duck and drake have buff plumage, orange-yellow shanks and feet, and brown eyes. The drake's bill is yellow while the duck's bill is brown-orange. (Malone et. al., 313) A Blue variety of Orpington duck existed in the Americas, but it appears these were absorbed into the Blue Swedish breed. (Holderread, 60)

    The Buff has much to offer the breeder who is looking for an attractive, dual-purpose bird. It is a good layer, typically laying about 150-220 eggs per year, and it gains weight relatively rapidly, making it ready for market within 8-10 weeks. (Batty, 108) Many consider the Buff a good meat bird that dresses out well because its light pin feathers do not show on the plucked carcass. Despite this, Buff numbers languished when industry growers followed consumer interest in cheap meat and focused attention on the faster growing Pekin even though many believe it to be less tasty. (Holderread, 60)

    When choosing breeders, select robust, active, strong-legged birds with a good laying history. Avoid birds that are significantly under Standard weight and have bills with excessively concave top lines. Full-sized birds with straight bills attached high on the head make valuable breeders. Select against any non-buff plumage for show-birds. Select for white pin feathers for production birds.

    ALBC's 2000 census of domestic waterfowl in North America found 793 breeding Buff ducks. Eleven people reported breeding Buff, and there are five primary breeding flocks with 50 or more breeding birds currently in existence. (Bender, 4) Consider this rare, beautiful bird for a lovely and useful addition to your flock.

    Status: Threatened.

    Bibliography:
    Batty, J. Domesticated Ducks and Geese. Liss, England: Nimrod Book Services, 1985.

    Bender, Marjorie E. F. D. Phillip Sponenberg, and Donald Bixby. Taking Stock of Waterfowl: The Results of the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy's Domestic Duck and Goose Census. Pittsboro, NC: The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy, 2000.

    Holderread, Dave. Storey's Guide to Raising Ducks. Pownal, VT: Storey Communications, Inc., 2001.

    Malone, Pat; and Gerald Donnelly, and Walt Leonard. The American Standard of Perfection. Mendon, MA: American Poultry Association, 1998.​
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  2. pringle

    pringle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 16, 2009
    Pepperell,MA
    Ummm I dont have any but they sure do look pretty!I think I might get some actually they look like great dual-purpose ducks.
     
  3. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm PA ETL#195

    5,682
    53
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    Jan 25, 2010
    Collins, Arkansas
    We currently have an egg auction on eBay. If you want ducklings, try Metzer. We are very happy with their quality and temperment.

    From Ideal's website:

    Buff Ducks have an even shade of rich-buff plumage with the exception of the head and upper portion of the neck in drakes, which varies from rich fawn-buff to seal-brown. The ducklings have a distinctive ring of colors around the eyes, which helps to separate them from other ducklings.

    Standard weights at maturity are males-7 lbs. and females-6 lbs.

    We have found the Metzer Buff's to be a bit larger than the Ideal's. The Superior Farm drake is by far the largest. Excellent layers and lots of meat!​
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2011
  4. pringle

    pringle Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 16, 2009
    Pepperell,MA
    Sweet,I think I will order a couple once it gets alot warmer.
     
  5. treldib

    treldib Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 5, 2010
    Southern California
    Very well set up thread [​IMG]

    I don't have any Buffs at the moment but they sure are pretty! [​IMG]

    Good Luck w/ the poll!
     
  6. Goat_Walker

    Goat_Walker I Am THE Crazy Duck Lady

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    Jul 9, 2008
    Maryland
    I dont have much input on this thread other than my favorite duck of all time was my first hen and only Buff Duck Road Runner [​IMG] FULL of personality, WONDERFUL mother, and the boss , lol. She was always talkative and just the life of the flock. I rescued her with a mallard drake from a family that had them living in their back yard and didnt want them anymore so she was going to release them onto one of the rivers around here. They were only 4 1/2 weeks old =/

    Other than that I dont have any good info on the breed. My Gal was a pet and we didnt breed for quality.


    Her and her son, She got a litt bit of blue in her feathers during winter, but im pretty sure she is pure since i know the guy that she was originally bought from.
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  7. MissusDee

    MissusDee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 7, 2011
    I ordered mixed ducklings from Metzer a couple months back not knowing what I was going to get, wanting to kind of be surprised for one, and two wanted some more "adult" ducks by spring. I got 5 Buffs and some Pekins. I don't know that I would have gotten Buffs on my own, if I just was say wanting some more ducks, but I am very pleased with them and couldn't be happier. They are in the awkward stage right now, but every day they are getting prettier and prettier and they are just such a pleasant duck as a breed. I am really looking forward to them getting more into the adult stage. I am really becoming a fan of the breed.
     
  8. HallFamilyFarm

    HallFamilyFarm PA ETL#195

    5,682
    53
    278
    Jan 25, 2010
    Collins, Arkansas
    Quote:Can you tell how many boys vs girls you have yet?

    Our Buffs started dropping eggs at about 5 months old. And it is dropping! Eggs laying everywhere. They other day the hens were so nice....left 3 eggs right by the gate. The gate that swings in! Could not open the gate without damaging the eggs. So one of the kids reached around and gathered the eggs up.

    Next we are going to train them to leave the eggs in the collection basket!
     
  9. MissusDee

    MissusDee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 7, 2011
    Well I did have them sexed, and the bands said one drake and 4 hens. From what I can tell now, that seems to be true. I like duck eggs and use them just like chicken eggs pretty much, so I imagine I will be more than set when they start laying! I usually keep my ducks all penned up overnight and my mallards were laying in the morning before I let them out, and would find them buried in various places in the straw. They kept trying to hide them from me!
     
  10. bopeep

    bopeep New Egg

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    Mar 30, 2011
    Hi. I'm new to this forum - found you because I googled buffs! We have yard birds - chickens - and would like to add some buffs to our flock. I've had pekins a few years back, and really enjoyed them, but I'm interested in the buffs because they're listed as "threatened" by albc, and also because they're very pretty.

    I see that you recommend Metzer Farms as the best place to buy them. I'm in NW Georgia, and wonder if it's too far to ship them from CA here?
     

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