This may seem obvious, but what about nails?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by whatnow?, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. whatnow?

    whatnow? Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2008
    SE PA
    Do any of you have siding nailed to sheathing? I have a plywood sheathing skin on the coop and want siding, but hadn't really given much thought to having to clinch all of the nails on the inside. The frame is more post and beam type, so there aren't many (o.k.-there aren't any) wall studs to try and hit. Same thing with the asphalt shingles, is it possible to hit the roof framing or is this just a bunch of clinching the nails, too?
     
  2. Reinbeau

    Reinbeau The Teapot Underground Premium Member

    I'm planning on covering the inside walls of my coop with cheap paneling (I've already got some that I took down from indoors, I don't care if what I end up buying matches or not!). That way they'll have the dead airspace for insulation and won't be able to get at those nails.
     
  3. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    whatnow? :

    Do any of you have siding nailed to sheathing? I have a plywood sheathing skin on the coop and want siding, but hadn't really given much thought to having to clinch all of the nails on the inside. The frame is more post and beam type, so there aren't many (o.k.-there aren't any) wall studs to try and hit. Same thing with the asphalt shingles, is it possible to hit the roof framing or is this just a bunch of clinching the nails, too?

    If you really wanna put siding on that way, I would STRONGLY recommend you put an interior wall on the coop (so it is double-walled)... there is NO way you're going to be able to clinch the nails over well enough to remove all risk of scratches and cuts from the points, and you may well damage the plywood and/or siding if you even try.

    What kind of siding were you thinking of using? Any chance you could use something that could be mainly *glued* on to the sheathing, using construction adhesive, with just a few screws where there happens to be framing handy?

    Ditto with the roof. If the ceiliing is not high enough to just 'ignore' protruding nails, you need to either cover them with another layer, or use a different kind of roofing. That is one of the big problems with shingles (weight being the other).... you *could* try to put in extra crosspieces carefully measured to lie where each row of nails will go, but a) you'd better be awfully good at calculating and laying it out, and b) it will be a giant pain in the patootey, and I say this as one who did it herself for a poorly-thought-out tractor roof. It roughly doubled the amount of time and work, increased the aggravation level about tenfold, AND did not work out very well in the end anyhow (the wood got to splitting from so many nails all in a row...) (BTW, I did try clinching the nails over in the roof, and it messes up the plywood and you can't get 'em clinched over well enough to be especially safe anyhow.)

    Hope this helps,

    Pat​
     
  4. whatnow?

    whatnow? Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2008
    SE PA
    I've been dwelling about this as I worked on other parts. I really like the look of cedar shakes, but time is now of the essance. I was going to screw battens across the wall (it's only 27" high on the outside) and nail into the battens. But now I'm probably just going to paint the sheathing and apply vertical battens for a fake vertical siding look. I have to put trim on soon, so I better make up my mind.

    I was considering using insulation and an interior wall covering, but after seeing the price of the insulation, I chose to put it off not considering that it was also going to cover the nails.

    Thanks for the feedback.
     
  5. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    What kind of siding were you thinking of using? Any chance you could use something that could be mainly *glued* on to the sheathing, using construction adhesive, with just a few screws where there happens to be framing handy?

    For attaching siding to plywood, that is what I would do.​
     

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