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Timothy Hay For Nests Okay?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Jan336, Jan 3, 2011.

  1. Jan336

    Jan336 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Can anyone tell me if timothy hay is ideal for nests or nest boxes? I can use hay and other methods, but I have found a bulk deal on timothy hay and was considering the usage. Any advice? [​IMG]
     
  2. thedeacon

    thedeacon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's fine
     
  3. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    Hay good, straw and chips bad.
     
  4. OkChickens

    OkChickens Orpingtons Are Us

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    Quote:Why would straw and wood chips bad? They will eat the hay. They are not interested in eating straw or wood chips from my knowledge and experience.

    -Nate
     
  5. Jan336

    Jan336 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Why would straw and wood chips bad? They will eat the hay. They are not interested in eating straw or wood chips from my knowledge and experience.

    -Nate

    If they eat the hay isn't that bad for them? So the straw and wood chips are bad for them or no? Im confused. [​IMG]
     
  6. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Hay sometimes causes impacted crops. Which can be serious. OTOH there are a number of people using hay longterm who've not had problems, so, depends on your risk tolerance.

    Nothing wrong with straw or shavings, many people use those too quite successfully. Or shredded paper, or various other things. Personallly I'm partial to shavings.

    Some people feel their chickens kick <one material> out of the nestbox less than they kick <one or more other materials> out, but that varies so much among people that I have a strong feeling it depends more on individual nestbox design and individual chicken personalities than there being any overall reliable *trend* in it.

    Honestly, I think it mainly comes down to having something reasonably cushiony and easily-spot-cleaned that is sufficiently nontoxic/nondangerous for your personal tastes. And a high lip on the nestbox opening. Within those constraints there are lots of materials all of which work approximately equally well.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. OkChickens

    OkChickens Orpingtons Are Us

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    Having hay is not bad for nesting boxes but they will try to eat it. Hay is grass that is cut and baled and they will peck and scratch in the nesting boxes. I use pine shavings or straw depending what is available. I just like it better. I would recommend straw because it is thicker and more durable. I hope this helps.

    -Nate
     
  8. chicken-owner-31

    chicken-owner-31 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Timothy hay is so expensive around here, I cringe at the thought of you using gourmet horse food for chicken beds. [​IMG]

    I use the leftover grass hay out of the round bales for my horses and haven't had a problem. My brooder babies are in shavings and haven't had a problem. I think they actually eat the shavings too. [​IMG]
     

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