To wash or not to wash, that is the question.

The Lazy L

Songster
9 Years
Dec 16, 2011
882
353
236
Newbie here and I'm confused.

I'm trying to plan ahead.

Coop should be here this month. 8 Buff Orpingtons arrive this May. So I figure eggs this fall.

I understand eggs have a natural protection and they shouldn't be washed before using.

But then I seen pictures of a washing station for the eggs.

So which is it? Wash or not to wash? Or is this question like asking which is better Chevy or that other brand?
 

TaylorHobbyFarms

Songster
9 Years
Dec 2, 2010
658
15
133
If they are to be used for eating, I wash with warm water and a cloth. Some say not to do this, that you can actually transfer bacteria from the outside of the egg to the inside, but we have had no problems and have been eating our flock's eggs for many years.

However, if you are hatching the eggs, I use a scrub brush to remove any obvious dirt or matter from the outside of the egg, but I do not use water to wash them.
 

Eggcessive

Addict
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Apr 3, 2011
61,282
53,580
1,322
southern Ohio
I'm a semi-newbie, but I don't wash my eggs because they will stay fresh much longer with the protective bloom coating. I clean off obvious dirt and poo, and I instruct my friends to clean them just before they use them with hot water so that the bacteria on the outside is less likely to enter the egg.
 

Jenski

Songster
11 Years
Jun 17, 2008
2,177
22
181
Middle Tennessee
I do not wash eggs for eating or hatching here . . . but I clean my coops out completely every day, especially the nest boxes. Keeps the eggs much, much cleaner.

When I give eggs to friends, I suggest that if they feel the need to wash eggs, do it right before cracking them. They even make egg "wipes" now . . . saw them at Tractor Supply.


Hope that helps. Good luck!
 

seminolewind

Flock Mistress
Premium Feather Member
13 Years
Sep 6, 2007
18,689
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Corydon, Indiana
From veterens: do not wash eggs until right before you cook them, you can scape some of the dirt off. And me; if it has dirt that can come off quickly, I spit on the egg and wipe it on my shirt. (don't tell)
 

KandiandJerry

Songster
8 Years
Aug 26, 2011
1,013
4
133
Springfield, Tennessee
x2 when we hatch ours we just take a scrubing pad and go over the whole egg. to be honest about we tried both ways washing them and not washing them however the ones we washed did produce a better hatch we was told to wash them in water better than hand warm to make sure the bacteria on the outside of the egg was gone.....it worked out good but as some people would say a hen sittin does not wash hers so. basically it is what it is some do and some dont advise..... my last hatch I used the scrubbing pad and rinsed them in the almost hot water and had 29 out of 32 hatch so basically I have been repeating that and have been getting better hatch rates......Good luck!!!! we hatch oegb (old english game bantams) all year
 

teach1rusl

Love My Chickens
10 Years
Jul 28, 2009
10,017
183
356
Floyds Knobs, Indiana
My Coop
My Coop
If you're talking for eating, totally up to you. I've read that you're washing part of the protective oils/substance that keeps bacteria, so you shouldn't do so unless you're going to be using the egg right then.
Personally, when I've encountered an egg w/a poo streak, I gently wipe off with a slightly damp sponge (no soap). Otherwise I don't even wash it off before I crack it open
hmm.png
 

Kaitie09

Songster
11 Years
May 28, 2009
1,205
35
216
South Central, PA
I have a bit of OCD and can't stand an egg that does not look perfect. We don't sell at all, so I take a sponge and scrub off the impurities (even those little blood spots). However, they do go right into the refrigerator as soon as I am done, and we normally eat them the next day.
 

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