To worm or not to worm that is the question.

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Jesusfreak101, Dec 1, 2015.

  1. GooseBuddha

    GooseBuddha Out Of The Brooder

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  2. GooseBuddha

    GooseBuddha Out Of The Brooder

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    Do you discard the eggs for 10 days after each dose administered? So that would be 20 days total? And did you put the medicine in each bird's beak or in their water? Thanks. I've adopted some new birds that are infested with ringworms.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2015
  3. Justso

    Justso Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, eggs are discarded 10 days after each dose. You need to dose them with the specific amount by size so it is administered by mouth. Let me know if you have any other questions!
     
  4. GooseBuddha

    GooseBuddha Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks so much!
     
  5. m5thfl

    m5thfl Out Of The Brooder

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    DE should worm the animals. I know pumpkin seeds can be used for dogs, but I've never wormed my dogs either.
     
  6. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Dewormers are not antibiotic's, they do not kill any bacteria, good or bad, they kill parasitic worms. As far as using something labeled for another animal? I do not know of any species specific dewormer. Many wormers are used for many different animals, including humans unlucky enough to pick up some parasite, the active ingredient is the same. The few that are labeled for chickens are woefully inadequate, they only treat roundworms and there are many parasites chickens can get other then roundworms. That is why most people use other wormers "off label". Also, not all parasites will show up in the droppings, not as the worm itself or the eggs. So a clear fecal sample does not mean the birds don't have worms. As far as letting nature take it's course? Unfortunately we don't live in a perfect world of green pastures and rainbows, nature is often incredibly cruel and wild creatures often live a very short life and die a hard death compared to our pampered pets.

    Yes, chickens and any animal can handle a certain amount of parasites. But how do you know when the numbers are out of control? Do you wait until the birds start showing poor condition, loosing weight, having diarrhea etc? Often times when they've gotten to that point it's hard to bring them back, parasites do a lot of internal damage.

    As far as DE as a wormer? Tried that years ago when it was all the rage, chickens got worms. So I deworm my birds a couple times a year, parasite loads are kept under control very easily. But it all boils down to a personal choice, what you want for you and your birds. Research poultry parasites thoroughly, don't rely simply on what you read on a forum, we all have our own opinions. But do your own research and base your choice on that.
     
    3 people like this.
  7. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

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    Generally during spring and autumn they go through a little phase where they are really not laying as much. They are all moulting or broody time of year. That's when I aim to worm so I'm not really loosing much in the egg department.

    I have a lot of wild birds that sneak into our pen despite my efforts to keep them out and mine love to raid the compost heap for worms when out wandering. Both are good ways to catch worms. I have children who touch the hens so I like to know they aren't going to be transferred to them if they do have them. I was told to alternate treatments using a different one each of the twice a year.

    I have read lots and lots of posts on natural methods for treating them with seeds and de. Have yet to read one where somebody actually had success curing an outbreak with them, lots of I prevent them, no I've got them, that got rid of them, which makes me wonder if nothing would have worked just as well........ . so I stick to stuff comes out of a bottle [​IMG]
     
    3 people like this.
  8. beccaWA

    beccaWA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's winter here, so the hens aren't laying much. I will deworm. It's my idea that since they free range so much that they could pick things up. I found a dewormer that looks similar to a small layer pellet that you add a little every day to their feed. The small bag is to be used with 50 lbs of feed. I'm sorry, I can't recall the name of it, but I got it at the feed store and there is NO delay to eat the eggs. I do not sell eggs during the worming period (just me) but I do eat them myself.
     
  9. GooseBuddha

    GooseBuddha Out Of The Brooder

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  10. GooseBuddha

    GooseBuddha Out Of The Brooder

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    Cafarmgirl: What do you use to deworm?
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2015

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