To worm or not to worm

Do you deworm regularly, even if you haven't seen evidence of infestation?

  • Yes

    Votes: 3 42.9%
  • No

    Votes: 4 57.1%

  • Total voters
    7

Folly's place

Enabler
9 Years
Sep 13, 2011
23,134
38,096
1,096
southern Michigan
You can have fecals checked at your veterinarian's office, and then deal with the results. Some flocks will need worming for different parasites fairly often, and some nearly never. I've had more issues with mites than anything else here, and then I use permethrin, and Ivermectin. Fenbendazole and Ivermectin aren't approved for use in chickens, but are very effective. There's no approved egg withdrawal time for either product, so we kind of 'wing it' to our comfort level. You can look it up on farad.org for more information. Mary
 

speeps76

In the Brooder
7 Years
Dec 7, 2012
75
9
48
North Carolina
You can have fecals checked at your veterinarian's office, and then deal with the results. Some flocks will need worming for different parasites fairly often, and some nearly never. I've had more issues with mites than anything else here, and then I use permethrin, and Ivermectin. Fenbendazole and Ivermectin aren't approved for use in chickens, but are very effective. There's no approved egg withdrawal time for either product, so we kind of 'wing it' to our comfort level. You can look it up on farad.org for more information. Mary
Thank you, that is helpful! I used to be a vet tech, and have read many fecal floats (for cats and dogs). We have a microscope at home… maybe I should just do it myself periodically. LOL Of course, we were mainly looking for roundworms, hookworms, tapes, and coccidia. I'd have no clue how to check for gapeworms, which concern me.
 

cafarmgirl

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 24, 2009
5,521
610
327
California, central valley
I deworm two to three times a year, rotating between Valbazen and liquid Safeguard for goats. The concern with relying only on fecal tests is that not all worms that chickens get live in the intestinal tract so not all of them show up on a fecal test.
 

speeps76

In the Brooder
7 Years
Dec 7, 2012
75
9
48
North Carolina
I deworm two to three times a year, rotating between Valbazen and liquid Safeguard for goats. The concern with relying only on fecal tests is that not all worms that chickens get live in the intestinal tract so not all of them show up on a fecal test.
I have Safeguard for goats. Do you give it to them directly or do you add it to the water? I only have 7 birds, so I'm sure I can dose each of them when the time comes. I'll just have to put the roo elsewhere when I dose the girls. LOL
 

cafarmgirl

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 24, 2009
5,521
610
327
California, central valley
I have Safeguard for goats. Do you give it to them directly or do you add it to the water? I only have 7 birds, so I'm sure I can dose each of them when the time comes. I'll just have to put the roo elsewhere when I dose the girls. LOL

I also have small flocks so I dose each bird directly. If you pick them off the roost at night it's really easy and then your roo shouldn't be a problem either, I just have a helper come with me to hold a light and help hold chickens.
 

babul

In the Brooder
Dec 31, 2015
18
2
24
Bihar, India
We use traditional medicine that is sour butter milk for internal parasites. Believe me it works great. it is also great supplementary source of protein and little fat. We also give it to buffalo calves because worms develope very quickly in their tummy due to rich buffaloe milk. For the winter we add little mustard cake it gives warmth and it also contains little sulfar which also helps in getting rid of pests.
Babul
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom