To worm or not to worm

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by speeps76, Jan 5, 2016.

  1. speeps76

    speeps76 Out Of The Brooder

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    Just would like to get an idea of how many deworm regularly to prevent a problem vs. those who deworm only when a problem is suspected.
     
  2. BlackRubleHatch

    BlackRubleHatch Out Of The Brooder

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    I deworm every 3 months to keep my chickens from having a problem. I use Safeguard horse wormer and it does great!
     
  3. speeps76

    speeps76 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm leaning this way, too. They have a fixed run, though they do get a lot of tractor time. Do you discard eggs for a couple weeks afterwards?
     
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    You can have fecals checked at your veterinarian's office, and then deal with the results. Some flocks will need worming for different parasites fairly often, and some nearly never. I've had more issues with mites than anything else here, and then I use permethrin, and Ivermectin. Fenbendazole and Ivermectin aren't approved for use in chickens, but are very effective. There's no approved egg withdrawal time for either product, so we kind of 'wing it' to our comfort level. You can look it up on farad.org for more information. Mary
     
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  5. speeps76

    speeps76 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you, that is helpful! I used to be a vet tech, and have read many fecal floats (for cats and dogs). We have a microscope at home… maybe I should just do it myself periodically. LOL Of course, we were mainly looking for roundworms, hookworms, tapes, and coccidia. I'd have no clue how to check for gapeworms, which concern me.
     
  6. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    I deworm two to three times a year, rotating between Valbazen and liquid Safeguard for goats. The concern with relying only on fecal tests is that not all worms that chickens get live in the intestinal tract so not all of them show up on a fecal test.
     
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  7. speeps76

    speeps76 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have Safeguard for goats. Do you give it to them directly or do you add it to the water? I only have 7 birds, so I'm sure I can dose each of them when the time comes. I'll just have to put the roo elsewhere when I dose the girls. LOL
     
  8. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    I also have small flocks so I dose each bird directly. If you pick them off the roost at night it's really easy and then your roo shouldn't be a problem either, I just have a helper come with me to hold a light and help hold chickens.
     
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  9. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    I also treat my birds individually, at night, with a helper if possible. I overwinter thirty to thirty-five birds, and it works fine with Ivermectin. Mary
     
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  10. babul

    babul Out Of The Brooder

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    We use traditional medicine that is sour butter milk for internal parasites. Believe me it works great. it is also great supplementary source of protein and little fat. We also give it to buffalo calves because worms develope very quickly in their tummy due to rich buffaloe milk. For the winter we add little mustard cake it gives warmth and it also contains little sulfar which also helps in getting rid of pests.
    Babul
     

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