To worm or not to worm?

jdoane

Songster
6 Years
Aug 7, 2013
609
30
128
Western Massachusetts
So I've read that pullets should be wormed a certain amount of time before laying. Would love to hear some pros and cons on this. And if recommending preventative worming please also let me know which wormer you recommend. I am rather confused with the this wormer takes care of these worms and this takes care of that.

Thanks!
 

sumi

Rest in Peace 1980-2020
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Jun 28, 2011
39,154
26,299
1,302
Many people deworm as a precaution once or twice a year. Others prefer to only deworm once they see evidence of worms, but I've learned the hard way that just because you can't see anything in their droppings it doesn't mean there's nothing to worry about. Personally I prefer to do a precautionary deworm every 6 months.
Valbazen is one of the highly recommended dewormers here. There is more info on that and yet another dewormer, Wazine, here:

https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/401475/worming-with-valbazen

Another popular one is Safeguard, more on that here:

https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/810587/help-dewormed-chickens-still-have-worms (post #3)

It is said that natural products such as DE, garlic, pumpkin seeds etc helps prevent and treat worms, but I'd recommend going to chemical route rather. You can read about one member's findings here:

https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/...ts-is-not-coryza-or-crd-parasites-are-rampant
 

jdoane

Songster
6 Years
Aug 7, 2013
609
30
128
Western Massachusetts
Thanks Sumi. Do you know what the youngest recommended age for worming would be. My pullets are only 7 weeks now and so probably not due to start laying for at least another 2 months. IF I worm them in about 6 weeks when they are 13 weeks would that be two young?
 

sumi

Rest in Peace 1980-2020
Premium Feather Member
8 Years
Jun 28, 2011
39,154
26,299
1,302
13 Weeks is good. I asked a vet friend of mine once when the earliest is that I can safely deworm my chicks and he recommended they be at least a month old.
 

dawg53

Humble
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Nov 27, 2008
28,322
16,082
956
Glen St Mary, Florida
Ok.  Another question.  Was looking online for Valbazen.  Could only find it for goats and other animals.  Is it the same thing for chickens?

Valbazen cattle/sheep wormer can be used on chickens, it's the best wormer on the market. Administer using a syringe without a needle, orally undiluted to each chicken. Dosage is 1/2cc for standard size birds, 1/4cc for smaller birds. Repeat dosing again in 10 days. There's a 14 day withdrawal period after the last dosing.
http://www.jefferspet.com/valbazen/camid/LIV/cp/16387/
 

jdoane

Songster
6 Years
Aug 7, 2013
609
30
128
Western Massachusetts
Valbazen cattle/sheep wormer can be used on chickens, it's the best wormer on the market. Administer using a syringe without a needle, orally undiluted to each chicken. Dosage is 1/2cc for standard size birds, 1/4cc for smaller birds. Repeat dosing again in 10 days. There's a 14 day withdrawal period after the last dosing.
http://www.jefferspet.com/valbazen/camid/LIV/cp/16387/

Thanks dawg53. This probably sounds like a total newbie question but I am so....
wink.png


Are there any pointers for opening a chickens beak and get the syringe in there?
 

cafarmgirl

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 24, 2009
5,521
613
327
California, central valley
I usually have someone help me by holding the chicken, then you can try a couple different methods. You can grasp their wattles firmly and pull down gently until they open their beaks. What works better for me is wrapping my hand around the back of their head to hold it still and then using one finger to open the beak. No matter how you do it they aren't going to like it and they are going to fight at first. The important thing is that you want to administer the dewormer slowly and let them swallow, you don't want the aspirating it.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom