True or False

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Minniechickmama, Sep 9, 2010.

  1. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    Do feeding apples to chickens stop them from laying or make them slow down? Someone told me this and I want to know if it is true or if it was a coincidence that maybe their hens were going into a molt about the time their apples were ripe?
    Any thoughts?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    Anything is possible. I've heard it also.


    Of course, I've never fed mine a lot of apples though.
     
  3. paddock36

    paddock36 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My guess would be that it depends on how many. I think anytime there is a major switch or change in their food it will affect laying.
     
  4. gaillardia

    gaillardia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I hope not; I have an apple tree above the run. They have been eating the crabapples that fall into the run. I'd sure like to hear from someone who has experience with this.
     
  5. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    It doesn't affect mine at all. Come the time our apple trees start dropping fruit, the free ranged girls go nuts over the fallen and sometimes rotten apples, and it doesn't affect their production at all.
     
  6. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    I doubt that apples will stop hens from laying. The only thing I could think of is that the light starts to diminish at about the same time of year that apples become ripe, so that would be a better explanation than what the chickens are being fed. My DH's family has a story about feeding the hens warm oatmeal, and that they got to fat so they quit laying. They finally had Granddad butcher them for the family. I finally figured out that the hens quit laying because of it being winter in Washington State, and my MiL was tired of caring for the chickens.
     
  7. 33yardbirds

    33yardbirds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I read or heard that you don't give them citris fruits. Mine get every other type of fruit, from raisens to watermelons and it doesn't slow egg laying at all.
     
  8. Boo-Boo's Mama

    Boo-Boo's Mama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ours got the fallen apricots and peaches this Summer and they go nuts over cantaloupe and watermelons rinds (my white EE's have nasty looking beards right now from the latest watermelon [​IMG] ). My girls don't seem to notice that fruit is suppose to cause a problem with laying.
     
  9. woodmort

    woodmort Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No truth to any of either food stimulating or stopping production. Light, temperature, moulting, as well as changes in their wellbeing will cause them to pause, even stop, but food isn't one of them. Mine will even fly up into the apple trees for fruit--makes no change in the number of eggs I get. The biggest thing may well be that most hens are spring hatched birds which means they will start laying in the fall and, generally, moult the next fall around apple time. Not cause and effect though.
     
  10. Minniechickmama

    Minniechickmama Senora Pollo Loco

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    Thanks everyone, I suspected the same as you said woodmort. Coincidental that moulting occurs the same time as the apple harvest? Makes sense to me. I do feed some things to get lazy hens laying though, cooked oatmeal and calf manna. It worked last winter and I am using it now on the spring pullets to get them moving out more eggs for me. I think it works.
    Thanks again.
     

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