Trying to incorporate one back into the flock.. and freezing weather

Beard4

Chirping
Apr 12, 2020
82
38
73
North Central Alabama
I have had 1 chicken that had a prolapsed vent possible egg bound (other chickens made her bleed pretty bad).. she is better now (after 2 days) with a little bit of over-hang above her vent. But I am trying to incorporate her back into the flock. This morning I took her out of the garage to let her free range with the others ( one peck her pretty hard several times) but my true concern is her feet keep turning pink as I take her out. It was below freezing this morning.. So I waited until 10:30 about 40 degrees.. Her feet again turned pink. So I brought her back to the garage, I will try again at noon or 1 pm.. She is going stir crazy.

1. Do I incorporate her while her vent is still protruding a little?
2. How do I get her incorporated in this cold weather? Next 2 or 3 nights it is going below freezing with 47 highs
3. Any help with the other chicks from pecking her?
 
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Beard4

Chirping
Apr 12, 2020
82
38
73
North Central Alabama
She laid 2 eggs (1 hard, 1 soft) the day after we found her bloody bottom.. but the top part of her vent seems to look like a hernia. It does have a small black piece below but I believe that is bruised where they pecked her..

She stands tall and looks to feel 100% other than the little protrusion. How do I keep her from going stir crazy and eating well?? She is in an old large plastic tub for now?



You absolutely must not put her back in with the rest of the flock as long as her vent is still prolapsing. You will regret rushing things.

If her vent is still prolapsing, it means she still has an obstruction that is causing it.

This article might explain some things that can help you better care for her. https://www.backyardchickens.com/ar...ng-from-vent-prolapse-oh-my-what-to-do.76124/
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
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Good to hear she passed both eggs. Many folks aren't aware of the possibility of the second stuck egg.

The black scabby nub is part of the vent, and it often is what get pecked. Use cortisone cream when you care for the vent, and also Vetericyn. These two will accelerate healing and reduce swelling, allowing for that injured part of the vent to be tucked back inside sooner.

Getting her back with the flock is always a priority right after protecting her from injury during healing. This is why many of us that have remodeled our runs over the years have included a "jail" or "infirmary" section. My seclusion section is about three feet by eight feet, and I use it for many purposes. When used as an infirmary, the sick or injured chicken can remain with the flock during the day while remaining safe. At night I bring them inside if they still have a vulnerable injury, and if they are merely recovering from illness, they roost with the flock at night.

Currently, it's snowing and there are deep drifts outside, so my two roosters are in the seclusion pen to help keep peace in the flock while they're cooped up. I've also used this handy partitioned off section to brood baby chicks.

If you can't fashion a temporary pen for her in the run, perhaps you have a large crate she can be in while with her mates during the day. But do not make the mistake of putting her with the others as long as her vent is still protruding.
 

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
25,416
38,584
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The pink feet may be an indication she isn't back 100% from being sick and her feet are in danger of frostbite due to her body not being able to be efficient in cooling the blood to her feet and legs as is normal in birds in freezing temps. You will either need to keep her inside until it warms up or hang a heat lamp over her while outside.

I have two heat lamps going in my two runs right now for my very old hens (ages 10 through 12 years) and an injured pullet recovering. These chickens with special needs can't be expected to be able to cope with extreme temps the way younger healthy chickens can.
 

Beard4

Chirping
Apr 12, 2020
82
38
73
North Central Alabama
Thanks, the big black nubby part went in already (that is what terrified me the first day).. I can send a picture if you'd like. I have been applying Vetericyn and keeping it moist with petroleum jelly (but I have some hyrdrocortisone 2.5%, is that an ok strength??)

We do Not have a second encloser. Wow, my run may be too small for that. but I will see if my husband can fashion me something later (hard with days being so short.)
I did place the other chickens under our enclosed porch (more area to roam) and placed our injured one back into the coop.. My concern is her pinkish feet.. also placed a heat lamp close to the water but her concern is to get back to the flock (not even nearing the light)

Thanks for all your help!



Good to hear she passed both eggs. Many folks aren't aware of the possibility of the second stuck egg.

The black scabby nub is part of the vent, and it often is what get pecked. Use cortisone cream when you care for the vent, and also Vetericyn. These two will accelerate healing and reduce swelling, allowing for that injured part of the vent to be tucked back inside sooner.

Getting her back with the flock is always a priority right after protecting her from injury during healing. This is why many of us that have remodeled our runs over the years have included a "jail" or "infirmary" section. My seclusion section is about three feet by eight feet, and I use it for many purposes. When used as an infirmary, the sick or injured chicken can remain with the flock during the day while remaining safe. At night I bring them inside if they still have a vulnerable injury, and if they are merely recovering from illness, they roost with the flock at night.

Currently, it's snowing and there are deep drifts outside, so my two roosters are in the seclusion pen to help keep peace in the flock while they're cooped up. I've also used this handy partitioned off section to brood baby chicks.

If you can't fashion a temporary pen for her in the run, perhaps you have a large crate she can be in while with her mates during the day. But do not make the mistake of putting her with the others as long as her vent is still protruding.
 
Last edited:

azygous

Enabler
11 Years
Dec 11, 2009
25,416
38,584
1,142
Colorado Rockies
2.5% cortisone will work. Use it sparingly, though, as it's high in steroids. I've used a lot of cortisone cream on a prolapsed hen and she didn't seem to experience any side effects, though. It would just be a few days, though, at most.
 

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