Umm, how's this gonna work? Dumb broody!

gritsar

Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!
12 Years
Nov 9, 2007
28,906
244
421
SW Arkansas
One of my turken/brahma Xs went MIA. I found her in the brahma coop (not her own coop), on a nest of eggs, acting broody-ish.

I don't think this is a good idea. My brahma girls are older, don't mind the younger birds if they are respectful, but I'm not sure they would be accepting of chicks in their coop. The brahmas are pretty set in their ways.

I'm trying to decide the best plan of action. I think it would be best to wait until nightfall and move her back to her own coop, don't you?
 

Ridgerunner

Free Ranging
11 Years
Feb 2, 2009
25,240
14,564
727
Southeast Louisiana
They've been laying in the Brahma coop so she'll probably want to go there unless you lock her up. So I see as your two choices.

1. Lock her where you want her. You know the typical broody enclosure.

2. Leave her be. If your Trahma has the proper broody attitude, it probably doesn't matter what the Brahmas think.
 

extraordinaryfowl

Songster
8 Years
Sep 6, 2011
477
3
101
Lancaster, PA
If you want her to keep setting and hatch chicks I would put her in a pen of her own so the chicks are safe when they hatch. But yes, moving at night is best.
 

gritsar

Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!
12 Years
Nov 9, 2007
28,906
244
421
SW Arkansas
Quote:Yeah, I know it well. In fact I just disassembled a broody enclosure in the larger coop, leaving only Jethro's intact.


I still don't understand the fascination the younger birds have with the brahma coop. It's very much the same, except the brahma coop is older.
 

gritsar

Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!
12 Years
Nov 9, 2007
28,906
244
421
SW Arkansas
Quote:In my larger coop the chicks are pretty much intermingling with the flock from about three days old. The chicks climb all over the older birds and only one, the head hen, has a problem with that. She pecks em, but doesn't really hurt them. My brahmas on the other hand have never had a chick hatched in their coop.
 

extraordinaryfowl

Songster
8 Years
Sep 6, 2011
477
3
101
Lancaster, PA
Quote:In my larger coop the chicks are pretty much intermingling with the flock from about three days old. The chicks climb all over the older birds and only one, the head hen, has a problem with that. She pecks em, but doesn't really hurt them. My brahmas on the other hand have never had a chick hatched in their coop.

One of my friend's said one of his Dominique's raised a brood of chicks with the father and he pitched in in finding them food, etc.. I usually put my broodies in rabbit cages, which are easy to transfer to grass when the chicks hatch.
 

Ridgerunner

Free Ranging
11 Years
Feb 2, 2009
25,240
14,564
727
Southeast Louisiana
Quote:Explanation: Is that what you want them to do? No

Are they female? Yes

Enough said!!!

Actually, I think they do learn by example, watching and learning from the mature hens. I'm actually a little surprised that some have not started roosting over there.
 

extraordinaryfowl

Songster
8 Years
Sep 6, 2011
477
3
101
Lancaster, PA
Quote:Explanation: Is that what you want them to do? No

Are they female? Yes

Enough said!!!

Actually, I think they do learn by example, watching and learning from the mature hens. I'm actually a little surprised that some have not started roosting over there.

 

gritsar

Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!
12 Years
Nov 9, 2007
28,906
244
421
SW Arkansas
Quote:In my larger coop the chicks are pretty much intermingling with the flock from about three days old. The chicks climb all over the older birds and only one, the head hen, has a problem with that. She pecks em, but doesn't really hurt them. My brahmas on the other hand have never had a chick hatched in their coop.

One of my friend's said one of his Dominique's raised a brood of chicks with the father and he pitched in in finding them food, etc.. I usually put my broodies in rabbit cages, which are easy to transfer to grass when the chicks hatch.

Yep, my roosters always helped raise the chicks. I have a almost non-stop silkie broody and a silkie with a shell defect that has never gone broody. The defective one helps the broody raise the chicks, including finding them food and providing them with warmth.
 

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