UPDATE... Flock tested negative for a viral infection

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sunflower01, Oct 23, 2009.

  1. Sunflower01

    Sunflower01 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 30, 2009
    Westminster, Maryland
    Our flock tested negative for any viral infection. They had a bacterial infection which we treated with durymicin on the onset. We lost 2 birds. It started with crusty eyes, and then a cough. The sicker two then got the rattling in their chests. This went on for about 3 1/2 weeks. The two we lost were a Polish hen and a blue Auracana hen. So sad [​IMG] It seemed to take the two that were the weakest/filghtiest. We had the Dept. of the Environment come out to test everyone and got the result back in two days. They were very informative and there was no cost to us for the testing. Iam so happy that we don't have to cull the flock. We will continue to treat with antibiotis for another 7-10 days.
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Did they say which bacterial infection? Some of those do produce carrier birds, too. Here is a very useful article for you:
    http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-2118/F-9109web.pdf

    Just want folks generally to not have the impression that it's only viral diseases than may produce carrier birds. For instance, salmonella, etc., as in the paragraph below. If it was one of the serious ones, I'm sure they'd have told you if there was a chance of them becoming carriers, though. Good thing you did testing!

    Salmonella and Paracolon Infections There are more than 2,000 species or serotypes of bacteria belonging to genus Salmonella; all are potential pathogens of poultry. Systemic effects usually are observed when infection occurs, but because the digestive system is primarily affected, they often are referred to as enteric organisms. The same is true of the group of organisms referred to as paracolons. Because of similarities produced by infections by these organisms,
    they are grouped under one heading. Both groups are found worldwide. Pullorum disease and fowl typhoid are infectious, acute, or chronic bacterial diseases affecting primarily chickens and turkeys, but most domestic and wild fowl can be infected. The causes are bacteria, Salmonella pullorum and S. gallinarum, respectively. Transmission is primarily through the egg but may occur by other means such as:
    1. Infected hen — egg — infected chick — spread in incubator
    — in chick boxes — in brooder house and on range — survivors become infected breeder birds.
    2. Mechanical transmission — carried about on shoes or equipment.
    3. Carrier birds — apparently healthy birds which shed organisms.
    4. Contaminated premises — from previous outbreaks.​
     
  3. Sunflower01

    Sunflower01 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 30, 2009
    Westminster, Maryland
    Melissa of the Dept. of the Environment said she will call us this evening with the specific bacteria type. Thank you for the web site.
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Hope it's good news! Again, you were very wise to have the testing.
     

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