UPDATE: Some chicks have cocci, others don't. Sulmet or Corid?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by JanetSmithery, Jun 20, 2010.

  1. JanetSmithery

    JanetSmithery Out Of The Brooder

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    May 11, 2010
    Eugene, OR
    Sigh...I knew I should have quarantined the three 3-week-old chicks we got today before introducing them to our two 2-week-old chicks, but was assured by a couple local chicken gurus that it would be better to introduce them to each other immediately to avoid them forming two small flocks later on. 24 hours later, it turns out that two of the 3-week-olds (Black Javas) have cocci and are deteriorating pretty rapidly. I didn't notice any lethargy when I first introduced them, or for a couple hours afterwards, but that could have been due to the stress/excitement of moving and being introduced to lots of new birds today. My only hope is that they can hold out until I get medication.

    I think they'll be bad enough off tomorrow that Sulmet might be preferred for their treatment, but it would probably be overkill for the other birds in the brooder. I'd prefer not to do any intestinal damage to healthy birds, but would Corid be strong enough to pull the sick ones through?

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    1) What type of bird , age and weight.
    --Currently at risk: two 3-week-old Black Javas
    --Also in the brooder: one 2-week-old Buff Orpington, one 2-week-old Australorp, one 3-week-old Easter Egger

    2) What is the behavior, exactly.
    --Currently at risk: Best way to describe it might be droopy. Earlier today, I thought they were just taking lots of naps. Now, even when standing, their heads just start to fall to their knees. Very lethargic.
    --Also in the brooder: very fine, active chicks. The Easter Egger is eating me out of house and home. The Buff Orpington is making a play for flock leader. The Australorp tags along for the ride.

    3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms?
    --As long as I've had them--12 hours, at least.

    4) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma.
    --No

    5) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation.
    --Not sure, just got the three 3-week-old birds.

    6) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all.
    --Currently at risk: Earlier today, they ate some of the organic, free choice chick feed that is in the brooder, and possibly some yogurt I'd introduced as a treat. They now no longer eat or drink from the nipple dispenser. I have to dip their beaks in a little cup of water.
    --Also in the brooder: What don't they eat?

    7) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc.
    --Currently at risk: Runny poop all day. The last few poops had a pink tinge to them, and the last ones definitely had some blood or bloody tissue. Might be intestinal lining, but looks more bloody to me.
    --Also in the brooder: Normal poops ranging from pretty darn dry to the regular ceacal evil.

    8) What has been the treatment you have administered so far?
    --1 Tbs apple cider vinegar in their quart water dispenser for all birds. I've been dunking the affected birds beaks in apple cider vinegar water that's also been lightly sweetened and making sure they drink it. Funnily enough, the un-affected birds continue to prefer the nipple waterer. I'm also trying to get all the birds to eat yogurt. None of them are all that crazy about it. I plan on cleaning the brooder out a couple times a day with some bleach solution, too.

    9 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? For example, do you want to treat completely yourself, or do you need help in stabilizing the bird til you can get to a vet?
    --I'm pretty sure this is coccidiosis. I'm hoping to get the birds through the night, get to a feed store in the morning, get some Corid or Sulmet, and administer as directed. Some posts here indicate that once the birds get droopy and start passing bloody stool, then it's a lost cause.

    10) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help.
    --Sorry!

    11) Describe the housing/bedding in use
    --Brooder's a large Rubbermaid tub with a heat lamp danging above, and newspaper lining the brooder.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2010
  2. Cloverleaf Farm

    Cloverleaf Farm Bearded Birds are Best

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    Sep 16, 2008
    Levan, UT
    I used Corid to treat some a while ago, they did fine...treat them all, with cocci, if one has it, they'll all have it before you know it. One of the birds was droopy with bloody stool, and I brought her back with it. I also went back to feeding the medicated starter, of course these were approx. 8 week old birds...

    good luck to you!!
     
  3. JanetSmithery

    JanetSmithery Out Of The Brooder

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    May 11, 2010
    Eugene, OR
    Update:

    Before posting, I made sure the affected Javas drank lots of water spiked with a little sugar and raw apple cider vinegar, and I spiked the communal font with ACV, too. The following morning, I was greeted with plaintive "I'm in pain" peeps, but it turns out that was simply because they didn't think they had enough food in their feeder. After I changed the bedding and fed and watered all the birds, everyone perked up an awful lot. I "investigated" the new poops from each bird and none had any blood in them, or were particularly runny.

    After the feed stores opened up, I got a bottle of Corid. All the birds have now been on that for about 12 hours, and they're doing great! The Javas are running around with the rest of 'em, and the incessant "pain" peeps have stopped. It looks like my brood is on the mend!
     
  4. ultasol

    ultasol Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 30, 2009
    SE Washington
    corid, which is the same as amprol, is MUCH safer than sulmet. Sulmet should be a drug of last resort as it has a much lower margin of safety, can only be used for 5-7 days before it causes damage, and if the dosage is high it can cause liver damage.
     
  5. goldenchic

    goldenchic Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 7, 2009
    i lost a chick 9 days ago had to wait for corrid to come off the internet, my 4 chicks have been on it 6 days now and doing fine goodluck
     
  6. Cloverleaf Farm

    Cloverleaf Farm Bearded Birds are Best

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    Levan, UT
    Quote:Yahoo!!!!!!!!!!!!! [​IMG]
     
  7. cottagefarmgirl

    cottagefarmgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 9, 2013
    I have some young guineas ( a few months old) and 1 seems sick. I would like to stay organic, but can't find anything about corid and organic. Is this the best option, or is there an organic choice, or can corid be used for organic growing.
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    southern Ohio
    Corid is a thiamine inhibitor, not an antibiotic. It prevents the thiamine uptake of coccidia. I know of other organic farmers that use it. Is the quinea showing the typical signs of coccidiosis such as lethargy, puffing up, poor appetite, diarrhea, and ruffled feathers?
     
  9. cottagefarmgirl

    cottagefarmgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 9, 2013
    Pretty mugh. SHe face planted today after being lethargic and not eating with feather ruffling. I figure I go get some corid tomorrow.
     
  10. cottagefarmgirl

    cottagefarmgirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 9, 2013
    Much sorry.
     

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