using feed grade grains for making bread or beer?

CanadaEh

Songster
May 31, 2018
356
640
176
Canada
Just wondering would it be safe to use feed grade whole grains, specifically whole barley for making bread or beer, does any one do it and would I need to wash and dry it first before crashing it in a corona mill?
 

cavemanrich

Addict
6 Years
Apr 6, 2014
15,921
51,846
1,257
Melrose Park Illinois
Here is my thought. I also agree with views of Percheron Chick. The purity and contaminants.
For making beer, I see the horse feed as OK. For making bread, I would opt for the somewhat higher price since I don't like sand grit in my mouth eating food:old
Stuff is high priced when getting a small quantity from a Health Food Store.
Its not all they bad if getting food grade in larger quantity. It is higher than horse feed, but not out of reach.
barley.PNG
organic.PNG
horsefeed.PNG
 

CanadaEh

Songster
May 31, 2018
356
640
176
Canada
For making beer, I see the horse feed as OK. For making bread, I would opt for the somewhat higher price since I don't like sand grit in my mouth eating food:old
Stuff is high priced when getting a small quantity from a Health Food Store.
Its not all they bad if getting food grade in larger quantity. It is higher than horse feed, but not out of reach.
you have more developed market in US. In Canada it is either in bulk for chickens at $12/55lb bag or it is a gourmet grocery item and than it is 10x times the price.

It is not the sand or sticks that concern me as I could easily sift or wash them out. It is if the grains would be treated with some chemicals that would be not allowed for human consumption otherwise.
 

cavemanrich

Addict
6 Years
Apr 6, 2014
15,921
51,846
1,257
Melrose Park Illinois
It is if the grains would be treated with some chemicals that would be not allowed for human consumption otherwise.
I don't think they treat the grains with anything. (anything bad for people, is also bad for chickens) Only treatment of grains that I am aware of, are seed corn, Am not totally sure if it has something to do with corn not spoiling, or as a indication that it is a seed corn. Seed corn is quite pricey, and for obvious reasons.

If you are able to sift, and clean up the barley, then go for it.:thumbsup
 

Cazook

Songster
Nov 24, 2019
326
467
151
I have never tried malting barley myself. I would be worried about screwing it up somehow and having the grains go mouldy or not sprouted correctly.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom