Using small holed hardware cloth

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by stano40, Apr 17, 2009.

  1. stano40

    stano40 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 16, 2009
    Southern Maine
    [​IMG] In an online article I was reading that it was important to use small holed hardware cloth. So I googled what they were referring to and realized it was a small hole galvanized mesh wire.

    As a little background I have ordered my first chicks, 15 polish chickens (straight run) so I'm not sure how many hens and roosters I will be getting. My wife and I also breed reptiles as a hobby so we have very large plastic bins that we use for keeping crickets that are used to feed the lizards. Our plan is to keep the chicks in groups of 5, the reason is that we ordered 5 White Crested Black Polish, 5 Golden Laced Polish, 5 Blue Polish and we would like to see how each individual group develops. The bins are plastic so the bottoms would be slick for the chicks to walk on.

    The question in my mind is this necessary as the article claims for the development for chicks to walk properly. Is the wire mesh needed or can the chicks legs and walking develop fine by just using pine shavings to walk on?

    bob
     
  2. chickabator

    chickabator Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 30, 2007
    ky
    I use old bath towels in my brooder and just rinse out and wash them . they just need something to keep them from sliding something that is not slick like news papers. sometimes they will eat the shavings and cause inpacted crops, that is why I use the old towels. they can't eat them.
     
  3. stano40

    stano40 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 16, 2009
    Southern Maine
    That's a good idea to use old towels. My second option was to use hay/straw on the bottom.

    I just remembered my mother using the hay/straw when she had her chickens.
     
  4. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    bob, the best thing I`ve ever used for bedding is hay. The reason is that chicks can develope balance and strength when on hay. Easy to clean up and cheaper than shavings. Can`t say I see the wisdom in keeping the chicks seperate. Three reasons, first it`s a lot more work, the chicks sometimes rely on each other for warmth, and when they get older, if you decide to not keep them apart, you will have great conflict when the groups are joined. However, if they will always be penned seperately for breeding pourposes or whatever and you don`t mind the extra work, it should go OK. Good luck and enjoy your new adventure...........Pop
     
  5. stano40

    stano40 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 16, 2009
    Southern Maine
    Thanks for that insight, I didn't think about the aggression that could happen if they are kept separately. Eventually they would all be together in the area that I'm building for them.

    So, now it's hay and togetherness is the rule.

    Thanks again for the advise.

    bob [​IMG]
     

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