ventilation and other tips

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by sierraboots, Apr 3, 2018.

  1. sierraboots

    sierraboots Chirping

    72
    48
    81
    Mar 28, 2018
    Iowa
    Okay guys, thank you for all the help so far! We have successfully transitioned our chickens outside to their coop. They are loving it. We will most likely be separating the ducks at some point but for now they’re there too. Our coop is a little over 8x8. The run area is pictured but we will eventually close that and finish it and turn it into a storage area. We are working on a fenced area for them. It originally started as a TSC chicken run which my husband was not pleased with and so he upgraded it. I’ve circled & pointed out the areas we have for ventilation. There is hardware cloth over them. Will this be enough? Any other suggestions? Thanks so much!!
    D0538426-0854-4F48-ADFF-D66A31F583A5.jpeg 0DF37D49-74D4-4DDC-BAFE-748ACDC95FC7.png 94B75B7A-AB4A-462E-9836-B23BA6410499.jpeg
     
  2. bruceha2000

    bruceha2000 Crossing the Road

    11,007
    33,034
    902
    Apr 19, 2012
    NW Vermont
    It would appear the only ventilation is at the peak, both ends of the coop and a slight gap where the roof meets the walls. You might find it useful to have some vents near the ground on the side walls so air can come in low and go out high through convection. Otherwise it might be quite stagnant below the top of the walls.
     
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

    27,610
    26,616
    907
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    What Bruce says. Plus, I see no windows. I'd cut in a window or two. Minimum recommendation is for 10% of floor space or 1 s.f. of ventilation PER CHICKEN. In my 8 x 10, I have 3 windows, 1 floor level, 2 soffit, 2 gable vents. Also, pop door, human door, clean out door and a double door at broody area. IMO, you can't have too much ventilation!!!
     
    oregonkat and bruceha2000 like this.
  4. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

    27,610
    26,616
    907
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    Otherwise, nice coop!
     
  5. Foster's Freehold

    Foster's Freehold Songster

    328
    406
    151
    Jun 7, 2013
    South Central KY
    That looks like a metal building. If it is, you need a lot more ventilation. A LOT more. That booger is gonna be HOT HOT HOT in warmer weather. And I'd add some insulation to the roof, if not the walls too. Add windows on either side on the windward direction so you have flow through venting. You also need vents near the bottom on the north side to bring in cooler air. This will carry the heat up and out the higher vents.
    Figure out how to plant vining plants around the outside so they can grow up and over the building and give it some shade. There are several good ideas on building a chicken proof planter. It won't heat up so badly if the sun doesn't hit it.
    Metal buildings are a great place to start, but you do have to compensate for thermal gain and loss.
     
  6. sierraboots

    sierraboots Chirping

    72
    48
    81
    Mar 28, 2018
    Iowa
    I was thinking a few windows as well. Would hardware cloth sandwiched between wood frames work? Or what is the best way to predator proof them if we want to keep them open at night
     
  7. Foster's Freehold

    Foster's Freehold Songster

    328
    406
    151
    Jun 7, 2013
    South Central KY
    Hardware cloth screwed in with washers will work. If you have them on the windward side, make sure you have some kind of closure or awning so rain doesn't blow in.
     
  8. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road

    27,610
    26,616
    907
    Nov 7, 2012
    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    I do an awning style window that opens out, with hardware cloth attached to the framing, and sandwiched between 1 x 3's. That allows the windows to be open even when it's raining, and the hdw cloth keeps the critters out.
     
    Foster's Freehold likes this.
  9. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

    5,686
    13,908
    542
    Mar 11, 2017
    South Park, Colorado, USA
    I just want to jump in and state the obvious. Ducks are wet. Due to the extra moisture from the ducks, more ventilation will be needed. I would recommend window and/or vents that can be opened and closed. This way over time you can adjust to find what works best for you. Parts of the year may be hotter/colder than others, parts may be more humid. Sometimes the wind my blow from the opposite direction. Vents that can be adjusted will serve you well over time.

    Vents like this would be easy to install and can be opened/closed and would prevent air from blowing directly on the birds.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006J2VDH...t=&hvlocphy=9028830&hvtargid=pla-350313924911
     
    bruceha2000 likes this.
  10. sierraboots

    sierraboots Chirping

    72
    48
    81
    Mar 28, 2018
    Iowa
    Oh yes we’ve realized now how wet and SMELLY ducks are keeping them inside with the chickens up until now. I’ve done a lot more reading up on the mess and other concerns they pose to the chickens. We will separate them within a couple months. We live in SW Iowa where it’s always super windy so those would probably work well. Thanks for the help everyone!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: