ventilation suggestions

DickMidnight

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I would open all soffit areas(between the rafters), front and back.
You can always block the ones near the roost, in the front anyway as it's not protected by the run, or baffle them to slow air movement and block snow.
https://www.backyardchickens.com/articles/ventilation-baffling.75434/
great idea with the filter medium.

you’d open that last soffit on the back wall even though it’s at the same height as the chickens’ heads when they roost? i was under the impression that you wanted any air flow to go above their heads.
 

aart

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you’d open that last soffit on the back wall even though it’s at the same height as the chickens’ heads when they roost? i was under the impression that you wanted any air flow to go above their heads.
Yep, I might cover it in the winter tho.

Would also think about lowering the roost.
 

DickMidnight

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Yep, I might cover it in the winter tho.

Would also think about lowering the roost.
you and @3KillerBs have mentioned lowering the roosts.

ive got a few questions/concerns about that that i wanna work through, without seeming like i’m questioning your advice. i just want to work in the practicalities of the space i have.

first, without opening that last soffit, ive got more than 1 sq ft/bird of ventilation, so unless it’s an absolute necessity, i think i can avoid that.

second, the roosts and nest boxes were designed with maximizing floor space in the coop in mind, and also for ease of cleaning. the lowest roost and the bottom of the boxes are high enough to allow the birds to walk under them. also, both units are completely removable to be cleaned.

there are two ways to lower the top roost.

i can either bring the whole roost ladder down 6-12” in which case the chickens can’t walk around that back 2ft or so of the coop.

the other way is to place them on a flatter slope, which brings the lowest roost closer to the nesting boxes and makes the whole coop feel a little cramped

if i can achieve adequate ventilation without compromising the layout of the coop id like to go that way. but if you guys think lowering the roost is a must, then i’ll go back to the drawing board and find a way to bring it down a little
 

rosemarythyme

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the other way is to place them on a flatter slope, which brings the lowest roost closer to the nesting boxes and makes the whole coop feel a little cramped
I'd consider changing the slope, if it's not too much work. Do you know what the slope is on the ladder right now, and how close the roosts are to one another?

Conversely, you could try opening up the soffits as recommended and just baffle them as aart noted during the winter, then open it up in summer as extra ventilation (even some draftiness) is welcome in hotter weather.

There's also the possibility that there won't be drafts at top roost height even after you open up the ventilation, but only you'd be able to figure that out for sure, as you'd need to physically check for drafts by holding a lightweight ribbon at roost height on a typical windy day, and seeing how much movement there is. If the ribbon moves only a little bit, then it won't ruffle the chickens feathers much at all - a lot of movement means there's a noticeable draft and it'll need to be buffered to prevent feather ruffling which means loss of body heat.
 

aart

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as extra ventilation (even some draftiness) is welcome in hotter weather.
Ditto Dat!

There's also the possibility that there won't be drafts at top roost height even after you open up the ventilation, but only you'd be able to figure that out for sure, as you'd need to physically check for drafts by holding a lightweight ribbon at roost height on a typical windy day, and seeing how much movement there is. If the ribbon moves only a little bit, then it won't ruffle the chickens feathers much at all - a lot of movement means there's a noticeable draft and it'll need to be buffered to prevent feather ruffling which means loss of body heat.
Yes, this^^^
I'd check for any draft there before moving roosts or covering vent.
 

3KillerBs

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do you all recommend a wall thermometer in the coop to keep an eye on things?

A thermometer and a humidity gauge (hygrometer (I always have to look that up)), can be very helpful.

I have a thermometer in my brooder but use the "Put my head and shoulders in/walk in and see what it feels like" method of estimating for the coops. In my climate I mainly worry about excess heat and that's easier to detect. ;)
 

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