Vet's Perscription isn't working

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by CoopedChik, Jan 22, 2012.

  1. CoopedChik

    CoopedChik Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My bantam flock was diagnosed with a bacterial sinus infection by my vet. He's a very good vet but he specializes in raptors not in poultry. He is the only avian vet in my area. I never take my chickens to the vet, only birds I take are my hawks. Any way I finally broke down and took a sick chicken to the vet because he was getting so bad and that's when he diagnosed him and my flock with that disease. He prescribed, Baytril, and Tylan and my sickest bird was getting better but now he has taken a turn for the worse he suddenly can't walk or hold himself up. He's fighting though to stay alive and I don't him to die. His eyes are all puffy (vet said that was from sinuses) and he's loosing weight fast. This disease killed his mate and I don't want to loose anymore. Like I said I've been giving them the treatment but it's not working now. Does anyone know what to do? I really don't have another $300 to take him to the vet this week. And as for the rest of the flock only like 5 out of 15 birds are showing signs of being better, others are just at the same point of sickness and one just got worse with a swollen eye.

    Please somebody help!!! If they have any idea I don't want to loose my birds.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  2. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Tylan is THE thing to use on chickens for sinus and respiratory illnesses. If it doesn't work I'm not sure what you could use but there are other medications at the feed stores you can give them, I think the one I heard of was Auromycin or something like that.
     
  3. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Both Baytril and Tylan are the best on the market. Baytril is by script only, so your vet is doing all he can. I have heard of Denegard being used to treat these types of infections, but Baytril is supposed to be the best. Unfortunately, if an infection progresses to a certain point, no treatment in the world is going to work. Sepsis stills kills a great number of people each year, so I can only think that it would be no different in other populations (such as birds).

    You could contact the vet with your concerns. He may be willing to treat the afflicted birds without the hefty price tag considering he has already seen them in the past and is currently treating them. He may just charge you for new meds or change the dosages of the current meds.

    I hope you resolve your issues soon. Good luck.
     
  4. thaokou21

    thaokou21 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Baytril beats tylan.
     
  5. CoopedChik

    CoopedChik Chillin' With My Peeps

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    do you know where i could get some?
     
  6. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Yeah, from a vet. It is (as far as I know) a prescription med only.
     
  7. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was thinking your vet had prescribed both Baytril and Tylan????
     
  8. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It sounds like your birds may have Mycoplasma Synoviae / Infectious Sinusitis, which is bacterial.
    If so, it sounds like a Tetracycline medicine may be helpful. Tetracyclines are very common in feed stores--Several are listed in the Poultry Medicine Chart on the site linked in my sig.

    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/203405.htm
    M synoviae was first recognized as an acute to chronic infection of chickens and turkeys that produced an exudative tendinitis and bursitis; it now occurs most frequently as a subclinical infection of the upper respiratory tract. M synoviae infection is also a complication of airsacculitis in association with Newcastle disease or infectious bronchitis. It is seen primarily in chickens and turkeys, but ducks, geese, guinea fowl, parrots, pheasants, and quail may also be susceptible. Serum (preferably swine serum) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide are required for growth on artificial media.
    Transmission, Epidemiology, and Pathogenesis:
    M synoviae is egg-transmitted, but the rate is low (probably <5%), and some hatches of progeny may be free of infection. Egg transmission is greatest during the first 1-2 mo after infection of susceptible breeders. Lateral transmission is similar to that of M gallisepticum , but the rate of spread is generally more rapid.
    M synoviae isolates vary widely in pathogenicity. Isolates from cases of airsacculitis are more apt to produce air sac lesions than isolates from synovial fluid or membranes. Some strains produce the typical clinical disease of synovitis. The paucity of natural outbreaks of clinical synovitis in chickens in recent years may be related to the adaptation of M synoviae to the respiratory tract; however, clinical synovitis in turkeys is relatively common.
    [​IMG]
    Clinical Findings:
    Although slight rales may be present in birds with respiratory infection, usually no signs are noticed. Younger birds, especially those under stress or suffering concurrent infections, are more likely to be affected. Outbreaks of infectious synovitis occur most commonly in chickens at 4-6 wk and in turkeys at 10-12 wk. Lame birds tend to sit. The more severely affected birds are depressed and are found around the feeders and waterers. Swellings of the hocks and footpads are seen. Morbidity is 2-15%, and mortality 1-10%. The effect on egg production is minimal, but instances of egg production losses have occurred.
    Lesions:
    In the respiratory syndrome, airsacculitis occurs when the bird is stressed from Newcastle disease, infectious bronchitis, or improper ventilation. In many cases, air sac lesions resolve after 1-2 wk. Early in synovitis, the liver is enlarged and sometimes green. The spleen is enlarged, and the kidneys are enlarged and pale. A yellow to gray, viscid exudate is present in almost all synovial structures; it is most commonly seen in the keel bursa, hock, and wing joints. In chronic cases, this exudate may become inspissated and orange.
    [​IMG]
    Diagnosis:
    A presumptive diagnosis can be based on the lesions and clinical signs, but laboratory confirmation is necessary. Skeletal abnormalities must be eliminated as the cause of lameness. The disease must be differentiated from viral tenosynovitis and from staphylococcal and other bacterial infections.
    The serum plate agglutination or ELISA test is used to detect infected flocks, but cross-reactions with M gallisepticum and other nonspecific reactions may occur. Reactors are confirmed as positive by hemagglutination-inhibition or by isolation and identification of the organism. PCR may be used to rapidly detect the organism in infected tissues. In turkeys, the agglutination test for M synoviae may not be reliable.
    [​IMG]
    Treatment and Control:
    Serologic testing and isolation similar to those for M gallisepticum have resulted in eradication of the infection in most primary breeder flocks of chickens and turkeys. Administration of a tetracycline antibiotic in the feed may be beneficial in treatment or prevention of synovitis. When airsacculitis is a problem, preventive antibiotic therapy during the time of respiratory reaction to Newcastle disease and infectious bronchitis vaccine may be helpful. Medication of breeder flocks is of little value in preventing egg transmission.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2012
  9. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

    Mycoplasma synoviae
    Synonyms:
    MS, infectious synovitis, synovitis, silent air sac
    Species affected: chickens and turkeys.
    Clinical signs: Birds infected with the synovitis form show lameness, followed by lethargy, reluctance to move, swollen joints, stilted gait, loss of weight, and formation of breast blisters. Birds infected with the respiratory form exhibit respiratory distress. Greenish diarrhea is common in dying birds (see Table 1 ). Clinically, the disease in indistinguishable from MG.
    Transmission: MS is transmitted from infected breeder to progeny via the egg. Within a flock, MS is spread by direct contact with infected birds as well as through airborne particles over short distances.
    Treatment: Recovery is slow for both respiratory and synovitis forms. Several antibiotics are variably effective. The most effective are tylosin, erthromycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, and chlortectracycline. These antibiotics can be given by injection while some can be administered in the feed or drinking water. These treatments are most effective when the antibiotics are injected.
    Prevention: Eradication is the best and only sure control. Do not use breeder replacements from flocks that have had MS. The National Poultry Improvement Plan monitors for MS.
    - - -

    Aureomycin is a chlortetracycline medicine very commonly sold at feed stores. It's about $7 for a little pouch of the powder. You mix a little in drinking water. I would recommend getting some ASAP if you think your birds may have MS.

    Note: Tylan is a tylosin medicine.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2012
  10. CoopedChik

    CoopedChik Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He did but the batryl he gave me is running out.
     

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