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What causes green eggs?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by blumatablo, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. blumatablo

    blumatablo Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 1, 2012
    The person who sold me my chickens said that one of them might lay green eggs. What causes that?
     
  2. jenifry

    jenifry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 26, 2012
    South Dakota
    Genetics, different breeds can lay different colored eggs.
     
  3. Cindy in PA

    Cindy in PA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    There are only 2 true colors of eggs, blue & white.
     
  4. HudokFarm

    HudokFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, there are only 2 true shell colors, blue and white. However, white eggs may be overlaid with a brown pigment prior to laying which causes them to be differing shades of brown depending on the hen. When you crack a brown egg, you will notice that it is white inside.

    A hen that produces blue eggshells may possess the gene for brown pigment as well, which will make the resulting egg appear to be varying shades of green. When you crack open these eggs, the interior will appear blue as that is the color of the shell.

    Here is a link I found useful in researching this myself a while back: http://poultry.allotment.org.uk/advice/eggs/egg-shell-colour
     
  5. HudokFarm

    HudokFarm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Forgot to add: your hens sound like Easter Eggers based on what you were told. They can technically lay any color of egg since they are a mixed of various breeds. Green eggs are among the most common since the blue egg gene is dominant to white and many of the crosses also pass on a brown pigment gene.
     

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