What chicken's are the best for egg laying?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Pookiebutt, Jan 3, 2016.

  1. Pookiebutt

    Pookiebutt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This Summer we added what we thought was a pullet to keep our one hen company only to find out it was a rooster. I have now found a home for the rooster and am looking into either getting chicks or pullets. What are the best breeds for eggs and to with stand cold winter nights? The hen we have now is believed to be a cross between a RIR and a Longhorn. She is smaller but lays big eggs. I'd like to have something that wont pick on her because she is smaller. Also wondering if it is better to get chicks or pullets?
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    If you want good egg production than choose from those breeds, there are plenty of sex links that are high production, and leghorns come in different colors, I personally like Ancona. In dual purpose breeds barred rocks and Australorp lay pretty well.

    I personally prefer to order chicks and raise them because I think the risk of bringing disease onto your property is less than half grown birds, young ones will develop resistance to organisms in your soil slowly if raised properly, older birds could be overwhelmed and stressed. It also depends on if you want to raise chicks, younger birds integrate into an existing flock easier.

    Any younger birds won't pick on your existing hen, she will become the one to watch out for.
     
  3. Pookiebutt

    Pookiebutt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you. You pretty much reassured me of what I was already thinking. My son really wants to raise chicks too. We will most likely go that route. I will also look more into the breeds you mentioned.
     
  4. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Leghorns are the best producers of white eggs. Red sexlinks and Black Sexlinks make the best producers of brown eggs, and you can be guaranteed of gender. The hen in your profile looks like she might be a Tetra Tint, it's a production type crossbreed.
    As for cold hardiness, how cold does it get? Most breeds can handle temps well below 0*F as long as the coop is dry and well ventilated.
    Honestly, get a few chicks of each breed you are interested in, if you've got the space. I, personally, like Easter Eggers for the mystery that they are. You never know what color eggs your pullet will lay until she starts laying. Production rate is also a bit of gamble with them, though. Australorps are consistent producers all year round and very gentle, but mine are once every other day layers and they like to brood. Rocks, of any color variety, are fun and inquisitive, and currently my flocks' top producers, laying just about every day. And you can get them in a bunch of different colors.
     
  5. Pookiebutt

    Pookiebutt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow thank you for all your information. We can get some pretty cold days/nights that can get below 0'F but usually doesn't stay that cold for to long. I keep lots of bedding (wood chips) in with the chickens. I'm hoping that's keeping them warm enough.
     
  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I have tried many different breeds and I haven't had one that couldn't handle the cold, some with larger combs, especially roosters can get frostbite on the comb points when it get brutally cold, but even my frizzles and the silkies I had, required no heat or extra care beyond keeping them inside during the cold spells, my large breeds come and go as they please.
     
  7. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Chickens wear down coats that keep them nice and toasty warm. The real danger in cold weather is moisture in the air. If the coop doesn't have enough ventilation, moisture will condense and freeze, causing frostbite.
     
  8. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    When temperatures fall into the -20, with -40 wind chills, frostbite does occur without any additional moisture, I do have plenty of ventilation.
     
  9. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Yes, it does get to a point where frostbite will happen regardless. But it certainly won't happen at 0*F if there is proper ventilation.
     
  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    correct
     

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