What do you do in alaska?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by rcentner, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. rcentner

    rcentner Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 6, 2009
    Le Roy, NY
    Just a silly question, What do the chickens do if you live in a place where the sun doesn't rise certain parts of the year? Do they want to roost all the time? I suppose it is a must to have lights for them? I didn't know where to put this post...coops? behavior?
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
  2. BirdBrain

    BirdBrain Prefers Frozen Tail Feathers

    May 7, 2007
    Alaska
    It is getting dark these days at 4:15 or so (in Anchorage). You just set a light on a timer to come on 12-14 hours earlier. That way they have the light they need and can go to bed with the sun. The days will continue to shorten until December 21st and then they get longer from there.
     
  3. Freeholder

    Freeholder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 23, 2008
    Klamath County, OR
    We lived in Tok, in the Interior of Alaska, for several years, and had chickens and geese there. We didn't have electricity or running water, so weren't able to have extra lights in the barn. The chickens didn't lay a lot in the winter, but we did get some eggs -- if we managed to collect them before they froze!

    Kathleen
     
  4. alaskamom

    alaskamom Out Of The Brooder

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    May 11, 2012
    Alaska
    As long as you keep them warm, give them room and lots of light they will lay all winter. We had nothing but double yolkers growing up on the Kenai Peninsula (not as dark but we get pretty darn dark and drop to -20 below often). Rhode Island Reds are WONDERFUL in Alaska...cold hardy and lay throughout winter!
     
  5. toofarout

    toofarout Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 14, 2011
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    I have a light on a timer, set so they got/get 15 or 16 hours of light. It seemed to work, they laid all winter.
    They were much less active in the winter than they are now however.
     

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