What does "ventilation without drafts" look like?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by greengardengirl, Mar 28, 2009.

  1. greengardengirl

    greengardengirl Out Of The Brooder

    Hello! I am working on my first coop, and everywhere I read talks about the importance of ventilation without drafts. What does this mean, in practice? I am converting an old dog 3X4 house into my coop ... so where would the ventilation "windows" go? At the top? At the bottom? Both? Below roosts? Above them? Thanks for any help.... [​IMG]
     
  2. ThreeBoysChicks

    ThreeBoysChicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Thurmont, MD
    I have several coops.

    In this first one, see the space under the roof line that is about 10 inches high. That is covered with Hardware Cloth. It allows air in, but because of its placement, does not allow rain or snow in and also in the winter, I cover 2/3 of it with a plexiglass window. In the second picture, there is a small window. I typically keep in cracked about 1/2 inch. Not much moisture or wind goes in, but keeps air moving and things dry.

    [​IMG]

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    In the Silkie Shalet, similar set up. The chicken door is always open. Oh the other side (second picture), the area above the window is covered with Hardware cloth. But under the roof enough to control moisture and wind.

    [​IMG]

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    Hope that helps. I am sure others will have ideas also.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2009
  3. chickiebaby

    chickiebaby Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 2, 2008
    western mass
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2009
  4. Zahboo

    Zahboo Simply Stated

    Feb 3, 2009
    Hope Mills, NC
    Quote:Everyone stands highly to patandchickens' ventilation page. And it has TONS of information
     
  5. greengardengirl

    greengardengirl Out Of The Brooder

    Ohhh... making so much more sense now.
     
  6. stormylady

    stormylady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 27, 2008
    Illinois
    Quote:I didn't post the question about ventilation but I was concerned about how to do it, I had a vague Idea, but turns out I wasn't even close, So thank you to the poster of the original question and Thanks to the good people that posted the very explained methods of doing it. Sure helped me !
     

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