What gun do I want?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Bettacreek, Jun 3, 2010.

  1. Bettacreek

    Bettacreek Crowing

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    Alright, so, the ex doesn't want to sell me my gun. *Rolleyes and a note to self to get stuff in MY name when it's mine* So, I'm thinking about getting something different. I loved that gun, but I know that if I get something that is the same model and all of that, and it doesn't work quite as well, I'll always be dissappointed. So, some of the issues that I had with the .243 were that I could not shoot anything through brush, and I need something that will kill stuff as large as bear and possibly elk. I like the fact that the .243 was accurate to the point that *I* could split bullet holes at 100yds. I also liked that it didn't have any kick, so I could shoot it all day. Now, I'd probably end up with a youth model of whatever I get, because I'm 5'5 and 160lbs, and that's certainly NOT muscle, lol. Any suggestions?
     

  2. Q9

    Q9 General Headache

    Hmmm... Bear and elk? That's more of a job for a shotgun than anything else, and a 12 gauge or even a 20 gauge has a decent kick with just birdshot. Anything with the power you're looking for is gonna have recoil. I'm not all that familiar with powerful hunting rifles, I'm more knowledgeable about assault rifles (Book knowledge only, but I desperately want an AK-47). Still, any rifle with the kind of one-hit kill sharpshooting power you're looking for is going to have a major kick.
     
  3. TwistedSerpent

    TwistedSerpent Songster

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    My boyfriend loves his .243, he also loves how everyone tells him its not strong enough but its perfect for women and children (I guess things take less to kill if your female or under 18? Never understood the logic behind that one). He took his deer with it last year and a couple of hogs this year. Back in the day people did take larger game with it, its all about shot placement. I guess these days most people think more power means the animal is deader (as well as its less of an issue waiting for the perfect shot).

    He got me a 7-30 waters which I love too. Definatly a lot stronger then the .243 but the recoil isnt going to knock you down (I'm 5'5'' and 120lbs). That gun will have no issues at all taking game larger then a deer. It is hard to find though, but its made from a 30.30 which is another great choice for you I think especially for larger game. My BF would be able to help you much more then me though, he lives and breathes guns and hunting, I'll give him a text and see what he says.

    Here are videos of the hogs he got with his little .243, that everyone was laughing at saying its not strong enough. Used two bullets and dropped two hogs, others in the group with the more powerful guns took 3 or more shots and even then didnt take any pork home.

    Disclaimer - these are hunting videos please dont watch if you dont like viewing, there is some blood involved.




     
  4. TwistedSerpent

    TwistedSerpent Songster

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    You can tell with the videos he waited for the absolute perfect shot, in the second one he actually took out one that was hit in the leg by someone the day before.

    He says the 7-08, the .308, the 7-30 waters, 300 savage, 260 Rem, 7mm mauser, and the 6.5x55 would all fit the large game with little recoil needs.
     
  5. homesteadingcowgirl

    homesteadingcowgirl Songster

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    I just got a 270 for myself>> I 5'6", 135 lb. It is on the "big" side for me, but it will pull down what I need it to and I can definitely handle it. A recommendation had been made to me to "get the biggest gun that you can/want and LEARN to handle it." It made sense to me, and I was leaning towards the 270 anyways.
     
  6. TwistedSerpent

    TwistedSerpent Songster

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    He says really look at the .260 and 7mm 08 - least recoil and the most common.
     
  7. swift4me

    swift4me Songster

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    Be very careful of some of the advice you get on the internet from some well meaning folks who know "a little bit" about guns or hunting before you buy anything.

    First, you talk about "one gun" for up to bear and elk. That means that you are likely to be undergunned for the elk, or have more than you need to kill coyotes or foxes near your chicken coop.

    Second, a hunting rifle (and it's recoil) can be managed, as you don't take a larger hunting rifle out to shoot 50 rounds at the range. You shoot to zero the gun, and you shoot to stay sharp, but the recoil is enough to bother anyone, male or female. I know lots of big guys who have developed a flinch, and as a result, shoot poorly at game. If your first shot is a good one, it is enough. Muzzle breaks are great for reducing felt recoil, as is proper fit of the stock.

    Thirdly, you can have a muzzle break installed on any rifle. They are louder, but so what. If it reduces recoil and helps you shoot better, that is what counts.

    Fourth, the minimum caliber sufficient for the average person to kill and elk, is the .270, but many people still consider that too light. The .30-06, 7mm Mag, and .300 Winchester Magnum are what most folks use on elk and or bears when using rifles. There are lots of new calibers as well, short magnums, etc. and many are great. Most guys will tell you to buy what they bought. Keep that in mind.

    Fifth, what kills large animals is a well placed shot, a well constructed bullet that expands without breaking apart even when it hits bone, and a rifle that can send that bullet with sufficient speed and accuracy. Many people are poor shots, and many use poor bullets that fragment before they get t o do the necessary damage to kill the animal.

    I strongly suggest that you find a good gun dealer who will work with you to set up a nice rifle. You can get aftermarket youth stocks, or alter an existing stock, but the caliber, recoil and weight are the first things to consider. After that, a good scope and a well adjusted trigger. Go to a few gunshops until you find someone who really wants to help you as opposed to just sell you a gun.

    Have fun and be safe.

    Pete
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2010

  8. Boyd

    Boyd Recipient of The Biff Twang

    Mar 14, 2009
    MI
    listen to swift [​IMG]

    Betta, bear n elk aren't somthing I'd tackle with anything smaller than a 30 caliber bullet. I'm fond of a 30 .06 but you may find the milder .308 to be a perfect fit. Honestly, I only put about 30 rounds a year through my bigger guns, and use the smaller ones for pleasure shooting and to keep muscle memory in good shape. Although I could go through 200 rds with my .45 pistol, its much more fun to do it with my .32 when all I am doing is killing pop cans... something to think of.
     
  9. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Crowing

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    Be very careful of some of the advice you get on the internet from some well meaning folks who know "a little bit" about guns or hunting before you buy anything.

    I agree with that part....the rest....not so much.

    A 7mm08 with the proper bullet will kill anything any of the cartridges you named will.
    Recoil is very manageable, and isn't near as likely to make you develop a flinch as a 300 Mag.

    I bet your hunting buddies who flinched weren't very good shots to begin with, and kept getting bigger guns to compensate, which just made things worse​
     
  10. TwistedSerpent

    TwistedSerpent Songster

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    Quote:I agree with that part....the rest....not so much.

    A 7mm08 with the proper bullet will kill anything any of the cartridges you named will.
    Recoil is very manageable, and isn't near as likely to make you develop a flinch as a 300 Mag.

    I bet your hunting buddies who flinched weren't very good shots to begin with, and kept getting bigger guns to compensate, which just made things worse

    Exactly what my BF says, there's no reason to go as big as you can handle when less works just as well, you need to be comfortable shooting it no matter what. There are too many people out there who own too big of a rifle, making them shoot less accuratly meaning more missed shots and their solution is to get something bigger. My BF cant stant recoil, a 30.06 is way too much for him, and shotguns are horrible with recoil.

    Get one you're very comfortable with, basicly anything bigger then a .243 would do it with the perfect shot, and to get that perfect shot you need to practice and to practice a lot you need something youre very comfortable with. He went on to say that the two he recommends ( the .260 (the same as a .270 only less recoil) and the 7mm 08) are so close that choosing which one would depend on what you have available and what fits you best, both will punch through elk within the average distance elk are taken. Keep in mind too if your using it for bear defence you need to be extremely comfortable and confident with the gun in order to take a charging bear down, there is no room for error.
     

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