What is a "breeder?"

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by kathyinmo, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    I would like some opinions on what a, "breeder," is.

    Is propagation considered being a breeder? Just stick a few of one breed in a pen and call yourself a breeder? How does one become a breeder?
     
  2. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    A breeder is someone who strives to better the breed according to the standard of perfection.

    Breeding a pure breed, IMHO, does NOT make you a "breeder". It makes you a propagator of stock that should not be used/sold/bred/advertised as anything other than hatchery, or "pet" quality.

    Quick edit:
    Breeders who breed for conformation attributes understand and applaud those that breed according to the conformation requirements of the SOP as well as different and new varieties of that breed.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2010
  3. Cindiloohoo

    Cindiloohoo Quiet as a Church Mouse

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    [​IMG] You go girl!

    Propagating...eh not so much. BECAUSE, anybody can propagate. Example: I can propagate a rhododendron from a parent plant in a glass of water, but I can't improve it by doing so. That would take much more in depth knowledge that I lack in that area. So, I don't think propagating would/could be TRULY considered breeding.

    Breeding takes LOADS more studying and hands on experience IMO. The ability to select the best and pair with the best to (hopefully) improve upon the parent stock and strengthen the good genetics of that stock.

    I don't think anybody can be considered a TRUE breeder within the first year of owning the parent stock of anything. Not enough hands on experience.

    Just my opinion. [​IMG]
     
  4. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Just because someone was recently able to purchase their chosen breed/variety, but has dealt with the breed through another breeder should not disqualify them as a breeder either.

    Hands on experience can be overrated. Sometimes research is your best friend. That includes genetic research, questioning long-standing breeders and asking questions to judges can help the potential breeder come closer to their desired results.
     
  5. Cindiloohoo

    Cindiloohoo Quiet as a Church Mouse

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    Quote:I agree to a degree. I still think hands on is perhaps UNDER rated by some. It becomes very obvious when a person slaughters/culls their first chicken. That is often a necessity when breeding. Foreknowledge is GREAT, but it is not everything. Breeding..in the true sense is much more complicated than foreknowledge alone. AT LEAST a year of hands on is necessary IMO to be considered a serious breeder and not just a propagator. Again..JUST my opinion. I am enjoying the discussion though [​IMG]
     
  6. nzpouter

    nzpouter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    how about those that try to create new variety/ colours within an established breed...? Obviously they don't breed them according to standard (as none is written yet).... are they not breeders..?

    whoops... already mentioned... [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2010
  7. cracked_egg

    cracked_egg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My two cents, from a dog and horse "breeder"'s perspective:

    Anyone who puts two animals together for the purpose of reproduction is a "breeder"... Puppy mills "breed" dogs...

    The question is "what kind of breeder"? is the person in question? A responsible breeder and quality breeder has already been thrown around on this thread. A quality or responsible breeder breeds the best they can, to the standard, then goes out and proves it by showing (yes, I know this is a hot debate)

    So, that's my 2 cents, take it for what it is worth... There are all kinds of breeders, just some that breed to create new breeds, some to casually reproduce because they have a male and female, but have no real goal for the mating, some to improve, some only to make money, and some for production... The sad thing to me, are the people who honestly feel they're improving the breed yet are breeding sub par animals and selling them to people who are gullible enough to fall for it. This really irks me in horses!
     
  8. chicknerd

    chicknerd Chillin' With My Peeps

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    But not one of you have answered her original question? Ok, we know what a breeder is, but how do you become one? That is my question too. I have discovered a few breeds that I like, I am relatively new to chickens, but what are the next steps???

    I would like to hatch eggs - should I practice on regular eggs? But then I have pet chicks I dont really want.

    There are many breeders, but how do you convince one to give you eggs or chicks?

    I think these were part of the OP original questions.

    Thanks
     
  9. big medicine

    big medicine custom Brahmas

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    What makes a good breeder? I kind of equate it with the old saying about a good coach " he could come into town and beat your team, then turn around, take your team and beat his". In other words give a group of people each a similar quality trio of birds, in say five years the good breeders flock will have improved considerabley from where everyone started. A good breeder could then switch flocks with the less successful "propagator" in the group and over a period of time selectively breed that flock to overtack his former flock.

    Good breeding in my opinion, is having a eye for what makes a breed, the physical features that if every chicken in the world was solid white would still scream (insert breed here). I see way too many generic build birds, that if you would cover their combs and leg color you could not distinguish between half a dozen breeds. It is the knowledge and ability to recognize these details, that is the first step in becoming a good breeder.

    I'll get back to this later, I've got birds to tend to.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2010
  10. cracked_egg

    cracked_egg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How to become a breeder? Pretty easy if you go by my definition of what a breeder is.

    How to become a QUALITY breeder (ie respectable breeder)... Well, I don't know about in chickens, but in other areas of my life I've worked for some of the best breeders, and now continue to breed.

    So, my advice to a horse or dog "want-to-be-serious-breeder" is: read everything you can. Go to shows and network, meet as many people as you can, develop an eye for what you like. THEN sit down and figure out what your breeding goals are, just production? Trail? Show? Any breed or one breed? Etc. Try to start off with one breed, buy the best possible animal you can afford, and don't get attached. Then plan your breeding, see what comes out of it and go from there. In horses, I'd tell you start out with one mare, then slowly grow adding THE BESGT YOU CAN AFFORD! If you want to be serious about showing, and breeding to the standard, then you have to start out with the best you can, that may be better or worse than someone else's best...

    Also, there will always be animals that don't make the grade, I usually sell them as trail horses as they are sound in mind and body, just not show quality, so have a plan for your culls/be prepared to cull, even the breeders if they aren't producing well enough.

    And finally, "prove" that you're producing quality stock by going to shows or trail events, etc. and in about 3-5 years of consistent success (consistent being key) you can call yourself on the way to being a quality breeder, IMO.
     

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